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  1. coffee-n-cats:

    The full suite.

    (original post)

    (via zomganthro)

  2. (Source: aryastarks)

  3. "The thing that sucks about Girls and Seinfeld and Sex and the City and every other TV show like them isn’t that they don’t include strong characters focusing on the problems facing blacks and Latinos in America today. The thing that sucks about those shows is that millions of black people look at them and can relate on so many levels to Hannah Horvath and Charlotte York and George Costanza, and yet those characters never look like us. The guys begging for money look like us. The mad black chicks telling white ladies to stay away from their families look like us. Always a gangster, never a rich kid whose parents are both college professors. After a while, the disparity between our affinity for these shows and their lack of affinity towards us puts reality into stark relief: When we look at Lena Dunham and Jerry Seinfeld, we see people with whom we have a lot in common. When they look at us, they see strangers."

  4. "“Professional” wrestler (former) Ric Savage now has a television show on Spike TV called “American Diggers.” They’re Americans and they dig. Anyone with a garden shovel can make this claim. The problem is, they fancy themselves as “diggers” of artifacts and relics. And this is a problem because they really don’t know what they’re doing."

  5. nedroidcomics:

I caught the last part of an episode of Bones
nedroidcomics:

I caught the last part of an episode of Bones
    High Resolution

    nedroidcomics:

    I caught the last part of an episode of Bones

  6. sirmitchell:

    Mr Wizard’s a Dick

    hilarious to the final second. 

  7. Shows and Tells

  8. 90% gravity

  9. NTD segment on Candi Prambanan restoration after an earthquake in 2006.

  10. "Individuals do not ‘live’ art and culture anymore—they consume its performance. The culture industry impedes the development of thinking, independent individuals; it conveys a message of adjustment, obedience. People are diverted, distracted, and made passive. While there are many exceptions, archaeology in television documentaries and in museum displays is often presented as ordered, to be passively viewed. It is consumed as the cultural component of the leisure industry, rarely challenging and participatory."

     - Ian Hodder. 1986. Reading the Past.
  11. radical-cunts:

    Sister Citizen: Shame Stereotypes and Black Women in America with Melissa Harris-Perry

    MSNBC commentator, columnist for The Nation, and Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, where she serves as founding director of the Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South, Melissa Harris - Perry examines black women’s political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images in her new book, Sister Citizen. With wit and family anecdotes, Harris - Perry elaborates on how the shared struggle to preserve an authentic self and secure recognition as a citizen links black women together in America.

    (Source: youtube.com, via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

  12. inuitattackatigiit:

Isuma production’s offices in Igloolik, Nunavut. “Isuma” means “Think” - in the imperative. So the pretext for all of their films, as well as the message they proclaim to the town and throughout Inuit Nunaata, is to think.
They have been a key component in redefining and represerving Inuit culture - through their documentaries, their short films/video art that ask viewers to consider the intricacies and lyricism of traditional life as art in itself, and their fictional films that illustrate legends as well as help contextualize ‘traditional life’ in the medium we are used to seeing it on film, through human relationships. But they have also been important in establishing Nunavut’s self-sufficient postmodern relations to the rest of Canada and the world. Before Isuma came about, television was not common in Nunavut, and there were no programmes in Inuit languages. In addition to their independent work, they lobbied for changes in broadcasting and helped establish Inuit language programmes in the late ’80s. They both set example for how Inuit identity can be expressed on film and showed that Nunavummiut can engage with the rest of the world, in their own language, and that this is just as important for preserving and evolving culture as documenting the lives of those on the land.
If you click on the photo it will take you to their website where you can stream their major works, or download them. I have only seen Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (which I happily own) and some short films but can not wait to see the rest. For downloading they charge pay-what-you-can. Do NOT take advantage of this - Isuma is in financial trouble, they have stoped production for the time and their assets are being held. DO pay what you can if you wish to download and realize that the option to download for free is mostly designed for schools and community organizations. They say the average donation is 10$, I think everyone on tumblr can afford that. And if you can’t then stream them, the quality is the same. I definitely recommend that anyone of circumpolar persuasions sees them. When the Western film industry - richer than most people will ever be, churning out generic throw-away ‘entertainment’ - is overriding communication freedoms to save the smallest amount of profit, it is a tremendous gift that a small film company finds producing high-quality, culturally rich work and making it available to all, to be important enough to risk its owners’ stability.

    inuitattackatigiit:

    Isuma production’s offices in Igloolik, Nunavut. “Isuma” means “Think” - in the imperative. So the pretext for all of their films, as well as the message they proclaim to the town and throughout Inuit Nunaata, is to think.

    They have been a key component in redefining and represerving Inuit culture - through their documentaries, their short films/video art that ask viewers to consider the intricacies and lyricism of traditional life as art in itself, and their fictional films that illustrate legends as well as help contextualize ‘traditional life’ in the medium we are used to seeing it on film, through human relationships. But they have also been important in establishing Nunavut’s self-sufficient postmodern relations to the rest of Canada and the world. Before Isuma came about, television was not common in Nunavut, and there were no programmes in Inuit languages. In addition to their independent work, they lobbied for changes in broadcasting and helped establish Inuit language programmes in the late ’80s. They both set example for how Inuit identity can be expressed on film and showed that Nunavummiut can engage with the rest of the world, in their own language, and that this is just as important for preserving and evolving culture as documenting the lives of those on the land.

    If you click on the photo it will take you to their website where you can stream their major works, or download them. I have only seen Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (which I happily own) and some short films but can not wait to see the rest. For downloading they charge pay-what-you-can. Do NOT take advantage of this - Isuma is in financial trouble, they have stoped production for the time and their assets are being held. DO pay what you can if you wish to download and realize that the option to download for free is mostly designed for schools and community organizations. They say the average donation is 10$, I think everyone on tumblr can afford that. And if you can’t then stream them, the quality is the same. I definitely recommend that anyone of circumpolar persuasions sees them. When the Western film industry - richer than most people will ever be, churning out generic throw-away ‘entertainment’ - is overriding communication freedoms to save the smallest amount of profit, it is a tremendous gift that a small film company finds producing high-quality, culturally rich work and making it available to all, to be important enough to risk its owners’ stability.

    (via custerdiedforyoursins)

  13. selchieproductions:

    An interview with Spongebob Squarebob’s Maori voice.

    (Source: youtube.com)

  14. gingerhaze:

babies booth
babies

yep pretty much. oh bones. gingerhaze:

babies booth
babies

yep pretty much. oh bones.
    High Resolution

    gingerhaze:

    babies booth

    babies

    yep pretty much. oh bones.

  15. panasonicyouth:

    adailyriot:

    Pepper Ann: “Dances with Ignorance”

    got this from feministdisney’s Q&A

    “Pepper Ann was incredibly, well, racist, but the show “taught” her the right way/what she was doing wrong and why it was wrong, pretty well.    It would probably be pretty instructive for a lot of the people on tumblr claiming to “honor” native americans by dressing up as them etc.”

    THIS IS KIND OF AMAZING.

    (via markdoesstuff)