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  1. radiopaedia:

Our Top 5 Radiology Video Tutorials: http://goo.gl/Ti7kD Celebrating 6 Months of RadiologyChannel on YouTube! via our Facebook page
radiopaedia:

Our Top 5 Radiology Video Tutorials: http://goo.gl/Ti7kD Celebrating 6 Months of RadiologyChannel on YouTube! via our Facebook page
    High Resolution

    radiopaedia:

    Our Top 5 Radiology Video Tutorials: http://goo.gl/Ti7kD Celebrating 6 Months of RadiologyChannel on YouTube!

    via our Facebook page

    (via radiologysigns)

  2. Greek Historian Got Mummy Evisceration Wrong

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    Contrary to reports by famous Greek historian Herodotus, the ancient Egyptians probably didn’t remove mummy guts using cedar oil enemas, new research on the reality of mummification suggests.

    The ancient embalmers also didn’t always leave the mummy’s heart in place, the researchers added.

    The findings, published in the February issue of HOMO – Journal of Comparative Human Biology, come from analyzing 150 mummies from the ancient world.

    In the fifth century B.C., Herodotus, the “father of history,” got an inside peek at the Egyptian mummification process. Embalming was a competitive business, and the tricks of the trade were closely guarded secrets, said study co-author Andrew Wade, an anthropologist at the University of Western Ontario. Read more.

  3. moshita:

    animated gifs of assorted fruits, vegetables and other plants with a research-only MRI scanner 

    Andy Ellison

    (Source: moshita, via plio-cavedeposits)

  4. radiologysigns:

QUIZ: 1yo girl who fell over and sustained a minor scratch. What abnormality is seen? Click for ANSWER
radiologysigns:

QUIZ: 1yo girl who fell over and sustained a minor scratch. What abnormality is seen? Click for ANSWER
    High Resolution

    radiologysigns:

    QUIZ: 1yo girl who fell over and sustained a minor scratch. What abnormality is seen? Click for ANSWER

  5. radiologysigns:

    QUIZ: 12yo boy who fell whilst playing football. Can you spot the important injury? Click for ANSWER. HINT: Our CRITOE post from a few weeks ago may come in handy. Skip video to 3:32 for discussion of this specific case.

    (via radiographynerd)

  6. fuckyeahforensics:

Orthotopic microCT images of the proximal femurs of A) a young adult B) an old adult, showing differences in trabecular patterns and density.
Analysis of 4000 year old human bone using microCT scans: Analytic implications for forensic and archaeological sciences
Microstructurally, bone loss occurs with increasing age in the trabeculae. Using radiography, other researchers have studied the applicability of using trabecular architecture as an indicator of age at death. However, primary and secondary groups of the trabeculae are impossible to distinguish using radiography and fine trabeculae that are resorbed first are not visually apparent radiographically until at least 30% of the bone has been lost. A unique collection of human skeletal remains (dating to 2200-2000 B.C.) was recovered from Tell Abraq, an archaeological site in United Arab Emirates. These remains were analyzed using Micro-CT scanning in order to obtain an accurate age of death and for understanding disease patterns for individuals buried in an undisturbed Bronze Age tomb. Methods: Due to the somewhat fragmentary nature of the collection and to deal with the loss of vital information, micro-CT scanning was applied to all available and intact proximal femora (n=70) to produce a three dimensional image of the microstructure of the trabecular architecture. The samples were scanned at 93 μm isometric resolution using an eXplore Locus RS Small Animal MicroCT Scanner (GE Healthcare, London, Ontario). The data was reconstructed with the manufacturer’s proprietary EVSBeamTM software. Image analysis was performed using visualization tool MicroView 2.1.2. Results: Micro-CT scans which produced far superior images (Fig. 1A, B) as compared to radiography allowed a better estimation of age at death. Using standard forensic sexing techniques, it was found that of the 70 adults buried in the tomb, 60% were males, and 40% were females. The majority of the population fell under the 30-40 year (n=23) and 40-50 (n=21) year bracket. While most of the individuals were free of pathology, there were a few cases (approx. 8%) of osteoarthritis, osteopororsis and one case of extreme femoral head fracture - probably due to hip dislocation. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first application of this technology to ancient human remains of this antiquity. The data provides a clear picture of life and death in a Bronze Age community and suggests by this newly established age profile, a healthy and robust population. These individuals, even in their old age, were relatively free from debilitating degenerative diseases so prevalent today. Skeletal remains of this antiquity are often fragmentary and difficult to analyze using traditional gross anatomical, histological or radiographic techniques. The digital 3D imaging has the potential to provide information currently not available using more traditional techniques involving histology or radiography. While this project focuses on the analysis of intact trabeculae patterns, assessment of chronological age and diseases, the research has the potential to be expanded to examine the underlying structures in identification of biomechanics, and for correlating diagnostic anatomical features of bone with the underlying microstructure. The application has significant implications for the field of forensic and archaeological sciences particularly in the areas of paleodemography and paleopathology.

    fuckyeahforensics:

    Orthotopic microCT images of the proximal femurs of A) a young adult B) an old adult, showing differences in trabecular patterns and density.

    Analysis of 4000 year old human bone using microCT scans: Analytic implications for forensic and archaeological sciences

    Microstructurally, bone loss occurs with increasing age in the trabeculae. Using radiography, other researchers have studied the applicability of using trabecular architecture as an indicator of age at death. However, primary and secondary groups of the trabeculae are impossible to distinguish using radiography and fine trabeculae that are resorbed first are not visually apparent radiographically until at least 30% of the bone has been lost. A unique collection of human skeletal remains (dating to 2200-2000 B.C.) was recovered from Tell Abraq, an archaeological site in United Arab Emirates. These remains were analyzed using Micro-CT scanning in order to obtain an accurate age of death and for understanding disease patterns for individuals buried in an undisturbed Bronze Age tomb. Methods: Due to the somewhat fragmentary nature of the collection and to deal with the loss of vital information, micro-CT scanning was applied to all available and intact proximal femora (n=70) to produce a three dimensional image of the microstructure of the trabecular architecture. The samples were scanned at 93 μm isometric resolution using an eXplore Locus RS Small Animal MicroCT Scanner (GE Healthcare, London, Ontario). The data was reconstructed with the manufacturer’s proprietary EVSBeamTM software. Image analysis was performed using visualization tool MicroView 2.1.2. Results: Micro-CT scans which produced far superior images (Fig. 1A, B) as compared to radiography allowed a better estimation of age at death. Using standard forensic sexing techniques, it was found that of the 70 adults buried in the tomb, 60% were males, and 40% were females. The majority of the population fell under the 30-40 year (n=23) and 40-50 (n=21) year bracket. While most of the individuals were free of pathology, there were a few cases (approx. 8%) of osteoarthritis, osteopororsis and one case of extreme femoral head fracture - probably due to hip dislocation. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first application of this technology to ancient human remains of this antiquity. The data provides a clear picture of life and death in a Bronze Age community and suggests by this newly established age profile, a healthy and robust population. These individuals, even in their old age, were relatively free from debilitating degenerative diseases so prevalent today. Skeletal remains of this antiquity are often fragmentary and difficult to analyze using traditional gross anatomical, histological or radiographic techniques. The digital 3D imaging has the potential to provide information currently not available using more traditional techniques involving histology or radiography. While this project focuses on the analysis of intact trabeculae patterns, assessment of chronological age and diseases, the research has the potential to be expanded to examine the underlying structures in identification of biomechanics, and for correlating diagnostic anatomical features of bone with the underlying microstructure. The application has significant implications for the field of forensic and archaeological sciences particularly in the areas of paleodemography and paleopathology.

    (via alphacaeli)

  7. jtotheizzoe:

    explore-blog:

    The very first video of a human birth seen in an MRI

    This is truly amazing. Also, filed under “Exhibit A” in the “Reasons to Respect Mothers” folder, as this looks rather … uncomfortable.

    In scientific terms, this illustrates perfectly how the human pelvis has evolved to be in balance with brain size at birth, and that our transition to walking upright was a tough one when it came to having bigger and bigger heads. If it weren’t for our head’s “soft spot” at birth, childbirth in an walking primate would be even more difficult than it already is.

    Bonus: Here’s a story at New Scientist with details on how this was done, with bonus links to other “interesting” MRI experiences.

    (Source: explore-blog, via radiographynerd)

  8. kenyatta:

    nabokovsnotebook:

    Chiropractor’s Beauty Contest, 1956 (Life Magazine)

    From The Retronaut

    Sometimes I want to go up to people who were alive during the 1950’s and yell “WHAT THE FUCK WAS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE!?!?!”

    I fully expect future generations will want to do the same to us.

  9. radiographynerd:

I’ve only ever done hand x-rays for neonatal patient with polydactyly (pre and post amputation) so this is super awesome!
radiographynerd:

I’ve only ever done hand x-rays for neonatal patient with polydactyly (pre and post amputation) so this is super awesome!
    High Resolution

    radiographynerd:

    I’ve only ever done hand x-rays for neonatal patient with polydactyly (pre and post amputation) so this is super awesome!

    (Source: culturedown)

  10. frankgaillard:

Another injury knuckle-heads sometimes get… Not all scaphoid fractures are through the waist of the bone. 
Related articles
scaphoid fractures
upper extremity fractures
frankgaillard:

Another injury knuckle-heads sometimes get… Not all scaphoid fractures are through the waist of the bone. 
Related articles
scaphoid fractures
upper extremity fractures
    High Resolution

    frankgaillard:

    Another injury knuckle-heads sometimes get… Not all scaphoid fractures are through the waist of the bone. 

    Related articles

  11. radiologysigns:

    Segond fracture - small avulsed bone fragment from the lateral margin of the tibial plateau. Avulsion at this location is the result of excessive varus stress on the lateral joint capsule. It is a small but important fracture as it has a very high association with internal derangement of the knee, particularly anterior cruciate ligament tear (right image) which is present in more than 75% of cases.

  12. radiologysigns:

    Fallen fragment sign - the presence of a bone fragment in the dependent portion of a lucent bone lesion. It is said to be pathognomonic of a simple (unicameral) bone cyst and is usually seen after pathologic fracture. Simple bone cysts are fluid filled and therefore fracture fragments can descend through the fluid uninhibited. Other lucent lesions such as fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst and enchondroma all have solid interiors which do not permit fragments to fall.

  13. (Source: boardbumm, via radiographynerd)