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  1. 
Police told several hundred West Papuan refugees not to march through Port Moresby’s streets today but they did anyway, calling for independence from Indonesia.
Their destination was city hall, where governor Powes Parkop raised the Morning Star flag of the West Papuan independence movement.
"Papua New Guineans: for the last 50 years we have been silent, blind, not seeing, not hearing, not speaking. But tomorrow it must change," he said.
Prime minister Peter O’Neill had asked him not to raise the flag.
[full article]

Police told several hundred West Papuan refugees not to march through Port Moresby’s streets today but they did anyway, calling for independence from Indonesia.
Their destination was city hall, where governor Powes Parkop raised the Morning Star flag of the West Papuan independence movement.
"Papua New Guineans: for the last 50 years we have been silent, blind, not seeing, not hearing, not speaking. But tomorrow it must change," he said.
Prime minister Peter O’Neill had asked him not to raise the flag.
[full article]
    High Resolution

    Police told several hundred West Papuan refugees not to march through Port Moresby’s streets today but they did anyway, calling for independence from Indonesia.

    Their destination was city hall, where governor Powes Parkop raised the Morning Star flag of the West Papuan independence movement.

    "Papua New Guineans: for the last 50 years we have been silent, blind, not seeing, not hearing, not speaking. But tomorrow it must change," he said.

    Prime minister Peter O’Neill had asked him not to raise the flag.

    [full article]

  2. Farmers and activists in Letpadaung, Burma are beaten and shot at for plowing the fields. Security forces have been cracking down on protests against the controversial Letpadaung copper mine—activists such as Ko Thu (pictured above) have been especially targeted for attempting to document the violence. [source] Farmers and activists in Letpadaung, Burma are beaten and shot at for plowing the fields. Security forces have been cracking down on protests against the controversial Letpadaung copper mine—activists such as Ko Thu (pictured above) have been especially targeted for attempting to document the violence. [source]
    High Resolution

    Farmers and activists in Letpadaung, Burma are beaten and shot at for plowing the fields. Security forces have been cracking down on protests against the controversial Letpadaung copper mine—activists such as Ko Thu (pictured above) have been especially targeted for attempting to document the violence. [source]

  3. sinidentidades:

Cruelty on the border
The bodies have been turning up for years, thousands of them, scattered across the borderlands in the American Southwest. Ever-stricter border enforcement has encouraged migrants to avoid cities like San Diego and El Paso and take their chances at remote desert crossings instead. As they trek across the vast, unfamiliar and scorching terrain, many get disoriented and run out of water, with devastating consequences. So far this year, 94 bodies have been recovered in Arizona alone.
Since 2004, a faith-based coalition called No More Deaths has been leaving gallon jugs of water near common migration routes in a desperate bid to save lives. But in May of this year, just as temperatures in the harsh Sonoran Desert climbed above 100 degrees, the group’s volunteers began to notice that their water bottles were being slashed, destroyed or emptied. With violence from ranchers and vigilantes a constant threat, No More Deaths installed hidden cameras. They were surprised at what they found: Border Patrol agents were purposely, even gleefully, destroying the life-saving jugs of water.
Visible on the tape, which will be broadcast for the first time tonight on the PBS show “Need to Know,” are three Border Patrol agents, two men and a woman, walking along a migrant trail and approaching half a dozen one-gallon jugs of water. The female agent stops in front of the containers and begins to kick them, with force, down a ravine. The bottles crash against rocks, bursting open. She’s smiling. One of the agents watching her smiles as well, seeming to take real pleasure in the spectacle. He says something under his breath, and the word “tonk” is clearly audible. “Tonk,” it turns out, is a bit of derogatory slang used by some Border Patrol agents to refer to undocumented immigrants. One agent told me it’s derived from the sound a flashlight makes when you hit someone over the head — tonk. After destroying the entire water supply, the three agents continue along the path.
(In response to specific questions about these events, Border Patrol officials replied only with a general statement emphasizing that misconduct would not be tolerated and that agents were trained to treat migrants with dignity and respect.)

The event was not an anomaly. A volunteer with No More Deaths had complained several months earlier to Lisa Reed, community liaison for the Tucson Sector Border Patrol, that water was being destroyed by agents. Reed responded then with an email saying, “I am preparing a memo from the Chief to all the agents directing them to leave water alone.” The agents on the tape apparently either never got the memo — or simply ignored it.
This attitude extends into the Border Patrol’s holding facilities.
I met Demetrio, a migrant in his early 20s from Veracruz, Mexico, after he was apprehended by the Border Patrol. At the time of his capture, he’d been lost in the Arizona desert without food or water for three days. When he arrived at the Border Patrol custody facility outside Tucson, he told agents he felt sick and was running a fever. “I asked to see a doctor … and they said no,” Demetrio said. “One of them said, ‘Put him in there and let him die.’” They shoved him into an overcrowded cell. He was vomiting blood and felt so faint he could barely stand. Yet, according to Demetrio, he was not given any food or water for at least six to seven hours.
Border Patrol protocol requires agents to provide detainees with food, drinking water and emergency medical services, to hold them under humane conditions, and to refrain from making degrading remarks, but this is rarely honored in practice, say human rights advocates. Over the past 15 years, reports documenting human rights abuses at the hands of Border Patrol agents have been published by Amnesty International, the ACLU, No More Deaths, even the United Nations. Contrary to their own protocols, Border Patrol agents have been accused of systematically denying food and water to migrants in custody, forcing them into overcrowded cells, stealing their money, confiscating medications, and denying them medical treatment. Migrants have described agents hurling verbal abuse, racial slurs and curses, and inflicting sexual assault, physical violence, even death. At least 14 migrants and border residents have died at the hands of Border Patrol agents over the past two years. These practices appear to be systemic, amounting to what No More Deaths calls “a culture of cruelty.”

    sinidentidades:

    Cruelty on the border

    The bodies have been turning up for years, thousands of them, scattered across the borderlands in the American Southwest. Ever-stricter border enforcement has encouraged migrants to avoid cities like San Diego and El Paso and take their chances at remote desert crossings instead. As they trek across the vast, unfamiliar and scorching terrain, many get disoriented and run out of water, with devastating consequences. So far this year, 94 bodies have been recovered in Arizona alone.

    Since 2004, a faith-based coalition called No More Deaths has been leaving gallon jugs of water near common migration routes in a desperate bid to save lives. But in May of this year, just as temperatures in the harsh Sonoran Desert climbed above 100 degrees, the group’s volunteers began to notice that their water bottles were being slashed, destroyed or emptied. With violence from ranchers and vigilantes a constant threat, No More Deaths installed hidden cameras. They were surprised at what they found: Border Patrol agents were purposely, even gleefully, destroying the life-saving jugs of water.

    Visible on the tape, which will be broadcast for the first time tonight on the PBS show “Need to Know,” are three Border Patrol agents, two men and a woman, walking along a migrant trail and approaching half a dozen one-gallon jugs of water. The female agent stops in front of the containers and begins to kick them, with force, down a ravine. The bottles crash against rocks, bursting open. She’s smiling. One of the agents watching her smiles as well, seeming to take real pleasure in the spectacle. He says something under his breath, and the word “tonk” is clearly audible. “Tonk,” it turns out, is a bit of derogatory slang used by some Border Patrol agents to refer to undocumented immigrants. One agent told me it’s derived from the sound a flashlight makes when you hit someone over the head — tonk. After destroying the entire water supply, the three agents continue along the path.

    (In response to specific questions about these events, Border Patrol officials replied only with a general statement emphasizing that misconduct would not be tolerated and that agents were trained to treat migrants with dignity and respect.)

    The event was not an anomaly. A volunteer with No More Deaths had complained several months earlier to Lisa Reed, community liaison for the Tucson Sector Border Patrol, that water was being destroyed by agents. Reed responded then with an email saying, “I am preparing a memo from the Chief to all the agents directing them to leave water alone.” The agents on the tape apparently either never got the memo — or simply ignored it.

    This attitude extends into the Border Patrol’s holding facilities.

    I met Demetrio, a migrant in his early 20s from Veracruz, Mexico, after he was apprehended by the Border Patrol. At the time of his capture, he’d been lost in the Arizona desert without food or water for three days. When he arrived at the Border Patrol custody facility outside Tucson, he told agents he felt sick and was running a fever. “I asked to see a doctor … and they said no,” Demetrio said. “One of them said, ‘Put him in there and let him die.’” They shoved him into an overcrowded cell. He was vomiting blood and felt so faint he could barely stand. Yet, according to Demetrio, he was not given any food or water for at least six to seven hours.

    Border Patrol protocol requires agents to provide detainees with food, drinking water and emergency medical services, to hold them under humane conditions, and to refrain from making degrading remarks, but this is rarely honored in practice, say human rights advocates. Over the past 15 years, reports documenting human rights abuses at the hands of Border Patrol agents have been published by Amnesty International, the ACLU, No More Deaths, even the United Nations. Contrary to their own protocols, Border Patrol agents have been accused of systematically denying food and water to migrants in custody, forcing them into overcrowded cells, stealing their money, confiscating medications, and denying them medical treatment. Migrants have described agents hurling verbal abuse, racial slurs and curses, and inflicting sexual assault, physical violence, even death. At least 14 migrants and border residents have died at the hands of Border Patrol agents over the past two years. These practices appear to be systemic, amounting to what No More Deaths calls “a culture of cruelty.”

  4. IDF calls for demolition of Palestinian village built on archaeological site

    archaeologicalnews:

    The Civil Administration is calling for the demolition of a Palestinian village in the southern West Bank, partly because it is built on an archaeological site.

    The call for demolition comes despite the fact that Israeli authorities have approved the construction of Jewish settlements on much more important archaeological sites, such as the settlement at Tel Rumeida in Hebron and the Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem.

    In the past year, the High Court of Justice has been asked to rule on the state’s intentions to demolish at least 12 villages south of Hebron (Susia, Dekaika, Bir al-Id, Saala and eight villages that have been declared part of army firing zone No. 918) located in Area C, which is under Israeli control, and force their residents to move to Areas A and B, which are under Palestinian civil control. Read more.

    Colonial archaeology at its finest.

  5. lati-negros:

    peaceblaster:

    Sign!

    Please share! :)

    Help us stop the Belo Monte Dam by signing the petition here

    (via aphotic-eniola)

  6. Facing Justice is a weekly TV program summarizing the proceedings in Case 002 against three well-known Khmer Rouge leaders. The case and the program are both ongoing, beginning from the first trial in November 2011 until now.

    While the genocide trials in Rwanda utilized the gacaca court system (to variable success), in Cambodia mass media is being used to convey communal justice.

  7. Petition to Sec. Clinton: Don't Fuel More Human Rights Abuses in Burma

    Just this month, a 48-year-old grandmother, “Ngwa Wi” (pseudonym), was held captive in a church by soldiers from Burma’s military forces, who beat, stabbed and raped her repeatedly for three days.

    Many abuses like this have been fueled or caused by foreign business in Burma; the soldiers who raped Ngwa Wi were working on a nearby foreign-owned dam project. Most American businesses have largely avoided such complicity in abuses like this due to sanctions. But this is all about to change.

    The Obama Administration announced on May 17 that it plans to suspend critical American sanctions on Burma, letting American companies do business in Burma without any oversight to prevent human rights abuses.

    If American sanctions on Burma disappear, American-owned projects will fuel more abuses including rape, murder, and even modern-day slavery, in exchange for profits.

    Please join human rights advocates from Burma in calling on U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton not to suspend American sanctions on Burma without putting legally binding safeguards in place to prevent American business from fueling atrocities and abuses.

    For more information, see the recent work of the Kachin Women’s Association documenting the abduction and rape of 48-year-old grandmother “Ngwa Wi” by Burmese soldiers working on a foreign-owned dam project in Kachin State: http://www.kachinwomen.com/advocacy/press-release/37-press-release/93-gang-rape-in-church-highlights-burma-army-impunity-for-sexual-violence-in-kachin-conflict.html

  8. becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Comandante RamonaDates: 1959-2006Why she rocks: She was a Mayan woman and an officer of the Zapatista Army, serving as a symbol of equality and standing up for the indigenous and impoverished peoples of Mexico. She led revolts and uprisings, demanding basic rights and needs for her people. Even when she was diagnosed with cancer, she still continued to fight for what was right.Because of this woman… she led the Mexican peoples to stand up to their government, and helped them receive things like food, water, and shelter, as well as their basic human rights.
becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Comandante RamonaDates: 1959-2006Why she rocks: She was a Mayan woman and an officer of the Zapatista Army, serving as a symbol of equality and standing up for the indigenous and impoverished peoples of Mexico. She led revolts and uprisings, demanding basic rights and needs for her people. Even when she was diagnosed with cancer, she still continued to fight for what was right.Because of this woman… she led the Mexican peoples to stand up to their government, and helped them receive things like food, water, and shelter, as well as their basic human rights.
    High Resolution

    becauseofthiswoman:

    Name: Comandante Ramona
    Dates: 1959-2006

    Why she rocks: She was a Mayan woman and an officer of the Zapatista Army, serving as a symbol of equality and standing up for the indigenous and impoverished peoples of Mexico. She led revolts and uprisings, demanding basic rights and needs for her people. Even when she was diagnosed with cancer, she still continued to fight for what was right.

    Because of this woman… she led the Mexican peoples to stand up to their government, and helped them receive things like food, water, and shelter, as well as their basic human rights.

  9. The Indonesian government is planning to stop sending maids abroad by 2017 amid reports that several maids are enduring abuse. Al Jazeera’s Step Vaessen reports from Jakarta.

  10. politics-war:

Indigenous women, bearing machetes, protest against the construction of the Belo Monte hydropower dam in Altamira, Brazil, Tuesday, May 20, 2008. 
politics-war:

Indigenous women, bearing machetes, protest against the construction of the Belo Monte hydropower dam in Altamira, Brazil, Tuesday, May 20, 2008. 
    High Resolution

    politics-war:

    Indigenous women, bearing machetes, protest against the construction of the Belo Monte hydropower dam in Altamira, Brazil, Tuesday, May 20, 2008. 

  11. There is currently an ethnic cleansing of black people going on in Lybia and it is reported NOWHERE in the major news outlets, which like most westerners, supported the racist thugs of Tripoli!!

    dreams-from-my-father:

    Will black people be wiped out for the second time on African soil by Arabs while the international community - that armed and supported the rebels - says NOTHING??

    The Tawerghas, a tribe of black Libyans in the South of the country, are being systematically targeted and killed by the new regime of Tripoli!! 

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2011/09/201192511758272379.html

    http://libyancivilwar.blogspot.com/2011/09/fall-and-purge-of-tawergha.html

    http://libyasos.blogspot.com/2011/09/genocide-racism-ethic-cleasing-of.html

    http://humanrightsinvestigations.org/2011/09/26/libya-ethnic-cleansing-tawargha-genocide/

    http://libyaagainstsuperpowermedia.com/2012/02/17/mercenaries-celebrate-occupation-while-genocide-continues-in-south/

    A few more:

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2012/01/2012126133028210385.html

    http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2012/libya260212.html

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/01/us-libya-displaced-idUSTRE81017X20120201

    (via blueklectic)

  12. An Ethnic War Is Rekindled in Myanmar

    Even as the Burmese government initiates political reforms in much of the country, it has intensified an ethnic civil war here in the resource-rich hills of northern Myanmar, a conflict that at once threatens its warming trend with the United States and could alienate Chinese officials concerned about stability on the border.

    International human rights groups and soldiers and officials of the Kachin ethnic group say that Burmese soldiers have burned and looted homes, planted mines, forcibly recruited villagers as porters and guides, and raped, tortured and executed civilians. Several thousand villagers have fled to China. Tens of thousands more who have been displaced could follow if the Burmese Army continues its offensive, local relief workers say.

  13. chelcuuh:

The Blind Project. 
Their mission: “We believe every life is important. All hopes are worthy. All dreams are priceless. All stories are valuable.”
 This Non-Profit Organization tackles the problems of human trafficking in Southeast Asia. For those of you who don’t know what human trafficking is the illegal trade in which human beings are being sold for the purposes of sexual exploitation and other forced labor. At this very moment there are millions of woman and children being trafficked into the multi-billion commercial sex trade.
 The Blind Project helps these woman and children who were once enslaved to tell their stories. To furthermore show the world that slavery still exists. The Blind Project also helps empower the victims and survivors by creating a sustainable style brand called Biographe. Biographe employs the victims and teaches them marketable job skills in fashion design and production while giving them a great work environment and a good living wage.
 Many of these children who are being sold into the sex trade don’t even know how it is to be a kid. When we have the luxury of living in a house,owning a computer, and having the ability to receive an education. It pains me to know that there are kids out there who are being sold and bought on a daily basis and there isn’t much I can do about it. I wanted to do my part and educate some of you who are actually taking the time to read this. Just know that slavery isn’t a problem from the past, but something that still exists and is getting worse. 
 Please and help out by contributing to this organization. Many of you buy t-shirts online, why not buy a t-shirt that can help this organization restore a child’s life back? So that child can live a normal life and get an education.Or reblog this post to spread awareness to this ongoing situation we have in this world. 
Unite with The Blind Project:
http://www.theblindproject.com/ 
The Blind Project’s online store
Other non-profit organizations:
Sold Project
The Project to End Human Trafficking
chelcuuh:

The Blind Project. 
Their mission: “We believe every life is important. All hopes are worthy. All dreams are priceless. All stories are valuable.”
 This Non-Profit Organization tackles the problems of human trafficking in Southeast Asia. For those of you who don’t know what human trafficking is the illegal trade in which human beings are being sold for the purposes of sexual exploitation and other forced labor. At this very moment there are millions of woman and children being trafficked into the multi-billion commercial sex trade.
 The Blind Project helps these woman and children who were once enslaved to tell their stories. To furthermore show the world that slavery still exists. The Blind Project also helps empower the victims and survivors by creating a sustainable style brand called Biographe. Biographe employs the victims and teaches them marketable job skills in fashion design and production while giving them a great work environment and a good living wage.
 Many of these children who are being sold into the sex trade don’t even know how it is to be a kid. When we have the luxury of living in a house,owning a computer, and having the ability to receive an education. It pains me to know that there are kids out there who are being sold and bought on a daily basis and there isn’t much I can do about it. I wanted to do my part and educate some of you who are actually taking the time to read this. Just know that slavery isn’t a problem from the past, but something that still exists and is getting worse. 
 Please and help out by contributing to this organization. Many of you buy t-shirts online, why not buy a t-shirt that can help this organization restore a child’s life back? So that child can live a normal life and get an education.Or reblog this post to spread awareness to this ongoing situation we have in this world. 
Unite with The Blind Project:
http://www.theblindproject.com/ 
The Blind Project’s online store
Other non-profit organizations:
Sold Project
The Project to End Human Trafficking
    High Resolution

    chelcuuh:

    The Blind Project. 

    Their mission: “We believe every life is important. All hopes are worthy. All dreams are priceless. All stories are valuable.”

    This Non-Profit Organization tackles the problems of human trafficking in Southeast Asia. For those of you who don’t know what human trafficking is the illegal trade in which human beings are being sold for the purposes of sexual exploitation and other forced labor. At this very moment there are millions of woman and children being trafficked into the multi-billion commercial sex trade.

    The Blind Project helps these woman and children who were once enslaved to tell their stories. To furthermore show the world that slavery still exists. The Blind Project also helps empower the victims and survivors by creating a sustainable style brand called Biographe. Biographe employs the victims and teaches them marketable job skills in fashion design and production while giving them a great work environment and a good living wage.

    Many of these children who are being sold into the sex trade don’t even know how it is to be a kid. When we have the luxury of living in a house,owning a computer, and having the ability to receive an education. It pains me to know that there are kids out there who are being sold and bought on a daily basis and there isn’t much I can do about it. I wanted to do my part and educate some of you who are actually taking the time to read this. Just know that slavery isn’t a problem from the past, but something that still exists and is getting worse. 

    Please and help out by contributing to this organization. Many of you buy t-shirts online, why not buy a t-shirt that can help this organization restore a child’s life back? So that child can live a normal life and get an education.Or reblog this post to spread awareness to this ongoing situation we have in this world. 

    Unite with The Blind Project:

    http://www.theblindproject.com/ 

    The Blind Project’s online store

    Other non-profit organizations:

    Sold Project

    The Project to End Human Trafficking

    (Source: quietthingsneversaid, via blueklectic)

  14. artivista:

CALLING ALL ARTISTS: ARREST THE BUTCHER PROJECT (Poster/Sticker/Stencil Making in Support to the People’s Manhunt for Palparan and Hilario)
On December 19, 2011 the Regional Trial Court (RTC) of Malolos City issued arrest warrants against Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan and three other military officers in connection with the disappearance of UP student activists Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño in 2006. 
Albeit long delayed, this development is considered a victory of the people’s campaign to bring to justice the military general who has been labelled “butcher” or “berdugo”, owing to the fact that he left a bloody and grim record of human rights violations in the areas he was assigned, such as the Southern Tagalog Region, Central Luzon, and Eastern Visayas. 
Extrajudicial killings, in particular, had been rampant in these areas operated in by Palparan. No less than UN envoy Philip Alston, for instance, has identified the general in his report as someone that ought to be questioned or investigated for many incidents of murder, massacre and other violations of human rights. [Read More]
artivista:

CALLING ALL ARTISTS: ARREST THE BUTCHER PROJECT (Poster/Sticker/Stencil Making in Support to the People’s Manhunt for Palparan and Hilario)
On December 19, 2011 the Regional Trial Court (RTC) of Malolos City issued arrest warrants against Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan and three other military officers in connection with the disappearance of UP student activists Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño in 2006. 
Albeit long delayed, this development is considered a victory of the people’s campaign to bring to justice the military general who has been labelled “butcher” or “berdugo”, owing to the fact that he left a bloody and grim record of human rights violations in the areas he was assigned, such as the Southern Tagalog Region, Central Luzon, and Eastern Visayas. 
Extrajudicial killings, in particular, had been rampant in these areas operated in by Palparan. No less than UN envoy Philip Alston, for instance, has identified the general in his report as someone that ought to be questioned or investigated for many incidents of murder, massacre and other violations of human rights. [Read More]
    High Resolution

    artivista:

    CALLING ALL ARTISTS: ARREST THE BUTCHER PROJECT (Poster/Sticker/Stencil Making in Support to the People’s Manhunt for Palparan and Hilario)

    On December 19, 2011 the Regional Trial Court (RTC) of Malolos City issued arrest warrants against Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan and three other military officers in connection with the disappearance of UP student activists Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño in 2006.

    Albeit long delayed, this development is considered a victory of the people’s campaign to bring to justice the military general who has been labelled “butcher” or “berdugo”, owing to the fact that he left a bloody and grim record of human rights violations in the areas he was assigned, such as the Southern Tagalog Region, Central Luzon, and Eastern Visayas.

    Extrajudicial killings, in particular, had been rampant in these areas operated in by Palparan. No less than UN envoy Philip Alston, for instance, has identified the general in his report as someone that ought to be questioned or investigated for many incidents of murder, massacre and other violations of human rights. [Read More]

    (via vinciboy)

  15. Political Dissidents Released in Govt Amnesty

    Min Ko Naing, Ko Ko Gyi, Htay Kywe, Mya Aye and Nilar Thein are among 650 prisoners released on Friday under a new presidential pardon. 
     
    Family members of political prisoners told The Irrawaddy on Friday that they were informed by the authorities that their relatives are on the list of freed prisoners. It was also reported that former Burma spy chief Khin Nyunt and intelligent official ex-Col San Pwint have also been released, as were ethnic political prisoners including Hkun Htun Oo and prominent Buddhist monk U Gambira, who was an organizer of the 2007 ‘Saffron Revolution.” Journalists including Zaw Thet Htwe were also freed.

    The government TV announcement read on Thursday: “For the sake of state peace and stability, national consolidation and to enable everyone to participate in political process and on humanitarian grounds, the government will grant amnesty to 651 prisoners so that they can take part in nation building.” 

    Cautiously happy for this announcement. I’m still not believing that the junta actually wants to transition to democracy.