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  1. ellobofilipino:

A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.
Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years. ellobofilipino:

A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.
Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years.
    High Resolution

    ellobofilipino:

    A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.

    Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years.

  2. vmagazine:

    Mario Testino “Alta Moda”
    Queen Sofia Spanish Institute 684 Park Avenue (between 68th & 69th St) Upper East Side (UES)

    Alta Moda is quite different from the portraits I am perhaps best known for,” famed fashion photographer Mario Testino said of his latest exhibit.

    Testino has strayed away from his typical subjects—celebrities and fashion models—and traded them in for natives of his home country, Peru. Alta Moda—which translates from Spanish as “high fashion” -  refers to the vibrant and ornate traditional and festive dress of Peruvians in Cusco, the historic capital of the ancient Inca Empire. 

    “I usually try to capture the moment,” Testino said. “But with this series, I wanted to do something very different—not just with my own work, but also with the practice of photography. I tried to fit as much time and history into each frame as possible—from the traditional and festive clothing to the Chambi backdrops to the Peruvian people in them.”

    The exhibition is curated by Queen Sofia Spanish Institute chairman fashion icon Oscar de la Renta.  source

    Final day of the exhibition: March 29, 2014

    (Source: vmagazine, via sinidentidades)


  3. High Resolution

    (Source: firsttimeuser, via saintshiva)

  4. queerkhmer:

A traditional Bahnar communal house in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. 
queerkhmer:

A traditional Bahnar communal house in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. 
    High Resolution

    queerkhmer:

    A traditional Bahnar communal house in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. 

  5. Learn to Read Baybayin

    Hey, everyone! I’m here to share this tutorial I made on learning Baybayin, an indigenous writing system of the Philippines. There are a number of online resources for this topic, but I wanted to give people an option that includes active practice and learning, instead of just staring blankly at a chart.

    This tutorial covers:

    • the basic characters (titik)
    • the kudlit
    • the virama kudlit
    • punctuation
    • culture and context of Baybayin
    • reading practice in Tagalog, Bisaya, Kapampangan, and Ilocano

    The tutorial is free on the Memrise website, so CLICK HERE to give it a try, and please reblog to share with anyone who might like to learn! Maraming salamat!

  6.  A Batalha de Tabatô (The Battle of Tabato)
    by João VIana

    Baio comes back to Guinea-Bissau 30 years after his exile for his daughter Fatu’s wedding. As Baio returns to the old places he once knew, memories from the war of independence are surfacing.

  7. Singing to Save a Language

    The nearly extinct Cahuilla language of tribes native to Southern California is being revived by elders who teach the tradition of birdsinging to students at a school run by the Morongo Band of Mission Indians.

  8. Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state. Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state.
    High Resolution

    Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state.

  9. Gurunsi architecture in Burkina Faso and Ghana

    via seshatarchitecture

    (via badethnography)

  10. barf-monster:

 Margaret Oenpelli from the Barunga community.
(it is important to keep her name with her image)
barf-monster:

 Margaret Oenpelli from the Barunga community.
(it is important to keep her name with her image)
    High Resolution

    barf-monster:

     Margaret Oenpelli from the Barunga community.

    (it is important to keep her name with her image)

    (Source: arakwal-dubay, via blueklectic)

  11. atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

    atane:

    zuky:

    nezua:

    Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

    Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

    This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

    With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

    It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

    Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

    This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

    (Source: melanskyyworld, via blueklectic)

  12. pinoy-culture:

    Filipina’s at the Spiritual Journey Tattoo shop and from Tatak ng Apat na Alon (Mark of the Four Waves) proudly showing their cultural pride with their traditional Filipino tattoo’s. Within the Filipino community, a cultural revival is happening through the revival of our traditional tattooing.

    ( Filipino men tattoo post here. x )

  13. escurls:

    zuky:

    bacarat:

    wuuing:

    zuky:

    Korean American culinary sensation David Chang is asked, What is the most under-rated cuisine? Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, he says Chinese food and explains that China is larger than Europe and that US Americans have no idea what real Chinese food is, nor does he believe they want to go beyond Panda Express, egg rolls, and General Tso’s Chicken.

    I love that he mentioned the aesthetics of Chinese food as being unappealing to Eurocentric eyes. I think this is really important!!

    Chinese dishes are often thought of as unrefined and unappealing precisely because they’re presented in a different manner than European/American/Western food is presented. You’ll seldom see Chinese food in small ass portions on large ass white plates because Chinese food is traditionally eaten communally. Even in the high class, super fancy restaurants in China and Hong Kong (I was dragged along to quite a few as a young child by my parents), the food is presented on a large platter in the middle of the table, meant to be shared by all members of the dinner party. Unless you’re at a noodle joint or a Western restaurant, no one orders individual dishes and everyone decides on the dishes together. Presentation in Chinese cuisine reflects abundance and community. Also, there’s just no need to dress up food that you know is going to taste amazing.

    Reblogging for commentary.

    I didn’t grow up in a very traditional Chinese family in terms of either genetics or geography: pretty much everyone two or three generations back has been an immigrant of some kind, and I’ve lived in Canada for most of my life. But the culture of food transcends and persists like nothing else, and I have the same hesitancy as David Chang when it comes to acceptance of Chinese food in North America or Europe: because it’s an entire different culture. As the above says, dishes are shared in the center and decided upon together - this is why Chinese restaurants almost always have round tables, never oblong. Consideration is shown by offering dishes to the eldest first, or by turning someone’s favorite towards them. Your bowl is filled with enough food for the next few bites, then refilled continuously in this manner throughout the mealYou as the diner keep an eye on everyone’s teacups, not reaching for a dish if someone else is going for it. Taste and culinary validity notwithstanding, it is impossible to understand a culture’s food if you don’t or are unwilling to understand just a little bit about the culture itself, to respect how we show respect.

    True. In Chinese culture, feeding one another is a way of showing affection. It’s one way grandparents typically demonstrate their love for their grandchildren, placing choice morsels in their rice bowl. In normal Chinese family-style eating, you give the best parts to others; you pay more attention to making sure others are being well fed than yourself; you always pour tea for others first; and you make sure nobody is even eyeing a dish in front of them before you fucking turn the lazy susan. Unless you’re an apprentice in a kung fu movie, then you have elaborately choreographed chopstick battles to compete for the last tea egg or fish head or duck leg which always ends up in the master’s bowl.

    One thing I’d add amid all this talk of Chinese food is that there really isn’t a singular “Chinese food”. There are thousands of kinds of Chinese food and styles of eating and dining. Even beyond the eight great regional culinary traditions (i.e. Cantonese, Sichuan, Hunan, Shandong, Jiangsu, Huizhou, Zhejian, Fujian), Chinese food really becomes micro-regional once you start travelling through the countrysides, because there are different plants and animals in different places and people cook and eat what’s there. The Buddhist monks in Huangshan have been developing recipes for a thousand years based on local mushrooms, herbs, roots, bamboo — which is just as Chinese as Peking duck or Cantonese crab. There’s street food and beef noodles in Taiwan, dumplings in Shanghai, hot pot in Sichuan, all of which are eaten differently. And there are formal banquets where food is served in individual portions for ten courses. It’s all Chinese food. Because Chinese food is many, many things.

    Helll yes this commentary is amazing. I’m not Chinese but lucky enough to be exposed to many different types of Chinese foods by close friends and at first I was hesitant to eat. But now I’ll try anything! Love it! yes every culture is different in the way the present and dine with each other.

    (via blueklectic)

  14. africaisdonesuffering:

    Namibia wipes colonialism off the map | World news | The Guardian

    prepaidafrica:

    More than a century after his death, Count Leo von Caprivi, veteran of the Franco-German war and successor to Otto von Bismarck as imperial chancellor, has been wiped off the map of Africa.

    His name had lived on in Namibia, a former German colony, in the form of the Caprivi Strip, a 450km area known for its tropical rivers and wildlife. But this week it disappeared for ever when the tourist hotspot was rechristened the Zambezi Region, after the river that forms the northern border with Angola.

    Namibian president Hifikepunye Pohamba also announced that Lüderitz, a harbour town, would now be called !Nami=Nüs, which means “embrace” in local Khoekhoegowab, a Khoisan language. The village of Schuckmannsburg in the former Caprivi region has been changed back to its original name, Lohonono.

    Zenzeli Khoisan explains how to pronounce !Nami=Nüs and Lohonono Link to this audio

    The move highlights the imprint of colonial mapmakers all over Africa where the names of streets, cities and regions are reminders of a traumatic past. Changing them is a slow process resisted by some communities and seen as a low priority by others with urgent needs.

    Namibia was a German colony from 1884 to 1919, then administered by apartheid South Africa until 1990. A small German population still lives in the country.

    In 2004 Germany apologised for the colonial-era genocide that killed 65,000 Herero people through starvation and slave labour in concentration camps. The Nama, a smaller ethnic group, lost half their population during what a recent book referred to in its title as The Kaiser’s Holocaust. Authors David Olusoga and Casper Erichsen argued that the camps – with their “bureaucratisation of killing” – influenced the Nazis in the second world war. (Read the rest)

    (Source: prepaidafrica, via ezibota)