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  1. Indian College excavation reopens in Harvard Yard

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.- This fall, Harvard archaeologists will continue excavations in Harvard Yard in the area of the 17th-century Indian College sited near Matthews Hall. This is the 4th excavation season in this area of the Yard. (Earlier excavations took place in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011). A foundation trench believed to be part of the old Indian College was found in 2009, and confirmed in 2011. This season, the class will continue to trace the Indian College foundation.

    On Thursday, September 11 at 1:30 pm, The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University Anthropology Department, and Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) invite the public to join the opening ceremony for the fall 2014 archaeological excavation in Harvard Yard. Read more.

  2. "

    In 2008, BBC One Television debuted a fantasy TV series about Camelot called Merlin (also called The Adventures of Merlin ), set at the time when Merlin, Arthur and Guinevere were teenagers, before they became legends.

    When the series debuted, viewers quickly noted the racially-diverse cast. Some criticized this multi-racial vision of British legend as “historically inaccurate” and “political correctness,” while others applauded it as a welcome twist which was more reflective of modern British society than the all-white Britain of ancient history.

    But was historical Britain all-white? Were there any people of color in Britain during “Arthurian” times? (And what do we mean by “Arthurian” times anyway?)

    In this lesson, we will investigate the racial composition of Roman & Medieval Britain, and how racial diversity was portrayed in medieval Arthurian legends.

    "

     -

    Black in Camelot: Racial Diversity in Historical England and Arthurian Legend (Fantasy and Sci-Fi in the Classroom)

    VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the Lesson Plan Here!

    Relevant Courses:

    • Writing/Literature
    • History, Classical/Medieval
    • Humanities, Western Civilization
    • Sociology
    • Anthropology/Archaeology

    Student Learning Outcomes

    • Locate and Discuss historical and/or archeological evidence suggesting or disproving the presence of Africans in Roman and medieval Britain (and Europe)
    • Demonstrate awareness of the portrayal of people of color in medieval Arthurian literature
    • Discuss the portrayal of ethnic diversity in current Arthurian-themed television shows and films

    (Source: medievalpoc)

  3. tetragrammaton7 said: My brother is a middle school teacher and I put him on to your blog. He smiled and said he's seen a ghost. Said in education, thinkers like you are almost extinct

    medievalpoc:

    archipluvian:

    medievalpoc:

    This is probably one of the most strangely flattering messages I’ve gotten.

    Because that’s probably exactly how I would feel if I came across this blog rather than running it.

    In the last 15 years or so, American culture has seen a massive shift toward the conservative that i think shocks a lot of people from my generation. Thinkers like me in education are almost extinct, because we have been driven out by financial, social, and political pressures trickling down from the top of the food chain, so to speak.

    It’s no secret that the quality of American education has, in general, been plummeting, along with drastic increases in censorship, pearl-clutching, and the tendency to reframe resistance movements as persecution of the people in power by those who have none.

    In response to this, you’re seeing more and more marginalized people taking advantage of social media to critique, educate, and converse with these shifts in culture….and ushering in a new age of actual accountability that hasn’t really been seen before; at least, not in my lifetime.

    My tone and methods are actually very similar to those of my own high school teachers. Books that I remember doing entire-class projects on, I find out have since been banned. There are many who find me aggressive, unprofessional, and a lot of other adjectives that invoke a sense of “respectability” versus “unprofessionalism” that makes me feel pretty shaken by the insight to the state of what’s going on in many classrooms across America.

    My hope is that with the next ten years or so, we can try and swing the pendulum back towards an ACTUAL center, instead of this false center that’s been artificially created in favor of conservatism, censorship, and erasure.

    Give your brother a hug for me, he’s doing one of the most important and most difficult jobs I can think of.

    Bear in mind that medievalpoc writes about /medieval European/ history from a completely /modern american/ standpoint using modern american definitions of who poc are … she ends up erasing a lot of ppl … like entire races and stuff …. from her accounts like basically only showing ppl she considers poc from her modern american perspective rather than taking into account historical and geographical context and showing all the people who were in that kinda category at the time . Thats her angle

    Which, you know. Would be a lot more of a thing if it was my fault that American education teaches European history at all, much less the WAY it does. But, you don’t care about that. you care about me, and my reaction to the situation, which you apparently feel needs a “warning”. About my “angle”.

    Because the literal exact point of this blog is that Europeans who are VISUALLY considered people of color

    by modern educators

    according to modern definitions of race

    are excluded from European history by modern educators

    because they look like people of color according TO and BECAUSE OF “modern American perspective”.

    The bottom line is, you think I’m DOING the thing I’m actually fighting against.

    I’m fighting the erasure of the people who are BEING erased from history. I’m responding to a situation that is already happening, I’m not creating that situation by talking about it.

    I’ve said a million times, this isn’t history in its OWN context, this is history as WE experience it in OUR context.

    This is about history BECOMES history, and WHY.

    Like, absolutely if you want like literally everything about various European racial and ethnic groups and how they were constructed in their historical geographic area, that’s NOT what you’re getting here. Like, we might touch on it, but it’s not the purpose.

    I didn’t invent the erasure of people who are being EXCLUDED right now in classrooms because of HOW THEY LOOK TO AMERICANS.

    THAT is the situation that I am addressing.

    By all means, feel free to do other things elsewhere.

    I just don’t see why you’re so interested in warning people about what I’m doing here, or seem to think there’s something wrong with that.

  4. We Were Children (2012) tells the stories of Lyna Hart and Glen Anaquod, two survivors of the Canadian Indian residential school system.

  5. Another Link Dump: Including Free Lesson Plans and Materials

    medievalpoc:

    The Image of the Black in Western Art (9 books)

    ArtSTOR Blog: Images for Teaching and Scholarship

    The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould

    Wikipedia page for Nanban Trade

    The Luttrell Psalter (Full Online Readable Text and Images)

    The Gorleston Psalter (Full Online Readable Text and [some NSFW!] Images)

    Color, Chromophobia and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts by Carolyn Purnell

    Foreign Tokens: The Blackamoor Brooch on Racialicious

    "That Smell": Sanitation in Victorian London on The Victorian Daily

    Norske Folkemuseum: Afrikanere I Norge

    The Lost Gallery: Flickr

    Art Resource: Database

    Archive.org: The Getty Museum (Database)

    Representation of Blacks and Blackness in the Renaissance by Peter Erickson (Art History/Critical Race Theory) 29 p., full color plates)

    Buzzfeed: 20 Bizarre Examples of Medieval Marginalia

    Do Clothes Make the Man (or Woman?): Sex, Gender, Costume, and the Aegean Color Convention by Anne Chapin

    The Black Presence in Pre-20th Century Europe: A Hidden History

    Kawahara Kiega: 18th and 19th Century Japanese Artist

    Wikipedia: Sexuality (in Art) In Ancient Rome

    Black British History: Representations of Blacks in British Art from the 17th - 20th Century

    Decentering History: Local Stories and Cultural Crossing in A Global World

    The Cultures and History of the Americas: Online Exhibition (the Jay. I. Kislak Collection at the Library of Congress)

    Library of Congress:Exploring the Early Americas (“conflict and accommodation” like wut)

    Nanban (Western Style) Armor, National Museums (Japan)

    Introduction: Reconstructing the Black Image by Gordon De La Mothe

    Rembrandt and the Female Nude by Erik Jan Sluitjer (Andromeda, p. 83; Chariclea, p. 158; Sleeping Negress, p. 299-301;Bathsheba and Attendant, p. 336 & 346, 350)

    H.P. Lovecraft’s Madness by Phenderson Djeli Clark (Critical Race Theory)

    How “Caucasoids” Got Such Big Crania and Why They Shrank: From Morton to Rushton by Leonard Lieberman (responses, dialogue and works cited included)

    The Advantages of Being a White Writer by Justine Larbalesteir (YA, Historical Fiction, Publishing, Representation) (response and rebuttal by Neesha Meminger)

    Loretta Ross and the Origin of “Women of Color”; Racialicious Article and Video (transcript available)

    Azie Dungey’s Comedy Webseries “Ask a Slave”

    Sample PowerPoint: Disney and Diversity (epilepsy warning)

    What Does it Mean that Most Children’s Books are Still About White Boys? by Soraya Chemaly

    Scientists Reveal the First European faces Were Not White

    Vatican Catacomb Paintings Show Female Priests

    Indiana University Study: More TV, Less Self Esteem, Except for White Boys

    Children Are Not Colorblind: How Young Children Learn Race by Erin N. Winkler, PhD. (University of Wisconsin)

    Disability Studies Quarterly: Free Online Full-Text (Interdisciplinary Studies incl.)

    Ianthe’s Library: Full Text PDF Humanities, Critical Race Theory, Cultural Studies, History, Interdisciplinary History, Historiography and more

    Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian (History, Historiography and Cultural Studies-Film)

    Injunuity: Independent Cultural Film and Animation Project (History, Historiography, Cultural and Gender Studies)

    Roman Slavery and the Question of Race by Sandra Joshel

    Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (American Historical Review, 1916-yes, it’s racist.)

    Race: Antiquity and its Legacy by Denise Eileen McCloskey

    An Archaeology of Race: Durham University- FREE Downloadable Teaching Resources and Lesson Plans

    Lesson 1 - Exploring what it means to be British

    Lesson 2 - Exploring immigration to Britain over the centuries

    Lesson 3 - Exploring what the Romans did for us

    Lesson 4 - Exploring how the Romans influenced the food we eat

    Lesson 5 - Exploring how the Romans influenced the language we speak

    Lesson 7 - Exploring Emperor Septimius Severus

    Lesson 8 - Exploring the North East of England, now and in Roman times

    Related Links:

  6. Learn to Read Baybayin

    Hey, everyone! I’m here to share this tutorial I made on learning Baybayin, an indigenous writing system of the Philippines. There are a number of online resources for this topic, but I wanted to give people an option that includes active practice and learning, instead of just staring blankly at a chart.

    This tutorial covers:

    • the basic characters (titik)
    • the kudlit
    • the virama kudlit
    • punctuation
    • culture and context of Baybayin
    • reading practice in Tagalog, Bisaya, Kapampangan, and Ilocano

    The tutorial is free on the Memrise website, so CLICK HERE to give it a try, and please reblog to share with anyone who might like to learn! Maraming salamat!

  7. 
California’s Morongo Band of Mission Indians is sinking its casino-generated wealth into a new school.
The Morongo School—which opened in 2010 on this 35,000-acre reservation tucked into a narrow pass between the San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountains—is the Morongo tribe’s biggest bet at the moment. After nearly 20 years of stunning economic development and the virtual elimination of poverty for its 1,000 members, the tribe is investing millions of dollars in education in the hope of reversing decades of low academic achievement, high dropout rates, and low rates of college attendance and graduation for its children.
[full article]

California’s Morongo Band of Mission Indians is sinking its casino-generated wealth into a new school.
The Morongo School—which opened in 2010 on this 35,000-acre reservation tucked into a narrow pass between the San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountains—is the Morongo tribe’s biggest bet at the moment. After nearly 20 years of stunning economic development and the virtual elimination of poverty for its 1,000 members, the tribe is investing millions of dollars in education in the hope of reversing decades of low academic achievement, high dropout rates, and low rates of college attendance and graduation for its children.
[full article]
    High Resolution

    California’s Morongo Band of Mission Indians is sinking its casino-generated wealth into a new school.

    The Morongo School—which opened in 2010 on this 35,000-acre reservation tucked into a narrow pass between the San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountains—is the Morongo tribe’s biggest bet at the moment. After nearly 20 years of stunning economic development and the virtual elimination of poverty for its 1,000 members, the tribe is investing millions of dollars in education in the hope of reversing decades of low academic achievement, high dropout rates, and low rates of college attendance and graduation for its children.

    [full article]

  8. Singing to Save a Language

    The nearly extinct Cahuilla language of tribes native to Southern California is being revived by elders who teach the tradition of birdsinging to students at a school run by the Morongo Band of Mission Indians.

  9. "

    At one hearing, a blind woman tearfully explained how she lost a prestigious scholarship opportunity after her GPA fell because her reader was laid off. That classroom assistance was essential because math figures needed verbal translation.

    Another mobility-impaired student testified that losing transportation services made moving between campus buildings extremely painful. It also affected her grades when attending some classes became impossible.

    "

     -

    Disabled Community College Students Fight Budget Cuts in Classroom AT and Other Academic Supports

    Funding for California community colleges was cut by 10%. Funding to disabled student services at California community colleges was cut by 40%.

    (via disabilityhistory)

    How bad is it that I’m surprised those services ever existed?

    (via josiahd)

    (via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

  10. chescaleigh:

So this has come up a few times on Tumblr, but I guess it’s worth re-posting. Here are my thoughts from earlier this year when I got invited to appear on Dr. Phil (I politely declined) to talk about my Slut Shaming video:

When I did Anderson Cooper last year, I was COMPLETELY unprepared. This resulted in me flubbing some major questions (“no, these statements aren’t racist!” doh) which then lead to me getting called out BIG TIME by the Tumblr SJ community. Fun times. In the year since, I’ve learned a great deal about racism and privilege (mine included) and would answer many of those questions completely differently. Moreover, I learned my lesson when it comes to preparing for tv interviews. First order of business: be prepared.  To make matters worse, at times the Anderson editing was rather deceptive. My biggest issue? Shots of me chillin’ between takes were used as reaction shots, which made me appear weak, nervous and unsure during some of the audience questions. Also, many positive comments/questions were left out, making the conversation at times appear one sided. Believe me, I’m not saying this to throw anyone on the show under the bus. The staff was super nice and my appearance opened some great doors for me. I mention this only because sometimes it’s easy to forget that talk shows and reality tv aren’t really all that “real”. 

So here’s where I’m at these days. Looking back, I really didn’t understand the scope of what “Shit White Girl Say…to Black Girls” had done or really meant until I read some of the things written about it. I knew it was honest and funny, but I didn’t think it was ground breaking, it would get me tv jobs and network appearances or that college professors would be asking students to write about it. I’d never heard the term micro-agressions before and had legitimately never considered any of those things to be racist. Why? Well, because as a kid, when I told my parents what was being said to me, they told me to shake it off because it wasn’t a big deal. No one ever taught me how to deal with those daily tiny jabs. I’d talk to my few black friends and they didn’t know how to define the experience so they continued to hurt, but I just thought that was just part of being black. And truthfully, I wanted to give my friends the benefit of the doubt rather than confront the fact that what they were saying to me was racist. Am I proud of that? Not at all. Is that embarrassing? Completely! I’m really lucky that my now good friend/mentor, Jukebox Jones aka @WeSeeRace reached out to me and offered to school me after getting ripped apart on Tumblr. That first phone call was around 2 hours and was BRUTAL. She told me all about myself and I cried like a baby. I didn’t understand why so much of black Tumblr was attacking me or why people thought my Anderson appearance was so bad. She talked to me like a stern parent and gave me a bunch of reading assignments. She told me she’d be there to talk to me anytime I had questions. At first it sucked, but it was worth it and largely because of her and a few others I’ve grown up and learned A LOT. So thank you Jukebox, g-aesthetic, racismschool and everyone else that has given me a chance to redeem myself following that abysmal appearance. Given that, this is why I’m so passionate about talking about social issues and trying to explain them in a way that’s easy to digest, especially for other black folk who are where I was last year. Sheltered, whitewashed “good black girl” colorblind types that stand up for white people any time racism gets brought up and think that it’s winning them brownie points. Look, they can be tough to deal with, but as someone that used to be that girl, please don’t give up on us. Remember our parents and school systems aren’t teaching us how to be black. They’re telling us to assimilate and conform to whiteness, assuming that’s going to “protect us” and help us get ahead in life, when in reality it holds us back more than we realize.
chescaleigh:

So this has come up a few times on Tumblr, but I guess it’s worth re-posting. Here are my thoughts from earlier this year when I got invited to appear on Dr. Phil (I politely declined) to talk about my Slut Shaming video:

When I did Anderson Cooper last year, I was COMPLETELY unprepared. This resulted in me flubbing some major questions (“no, these statements aren’t racist!” doh) which then lead to me getting called out BIG TIME by the Tumblr SJ community. Fun times. In the year since, I’ve learned a great deal about racism and privilege (mine included) and would answer many of those questions completely differently. Moreover, I learned my lesson when it comes to preparing for tv interviews. First order of business: be prepared.  To make matters worse, at times the Anderson editing was rather deceptive. My biggest issue? Shots of me chillin’ between takes were used as reaction shots, which made me appear weak, nervous and unsure during some of the audience questions. Also, many positive comments/questions were left out, making the conversation at times appear one sided. Believe me, I’m not saying this to throw anyone on the show under the bus. The staff was super nice and my appearance opened some great doors for me. I mention this only because sometimes it’s easy to forget that talk shows and reality tv aren’t really all that “real”. 

So here’s where I’m at these days. Looking back, I really didn’t understand the scope of what “Shit White Girl Say…to Black Girls” had done or really meant until I read some of the things written about it. I knew it was honest and funny, but I didn’t think it was ground breaking, it would get me tv jobs and network appearances or that college professors would be asking students to write about it. I’d never heard the term micro-agressions before and had legitimately never considered any of those things to be racist. Why? Well, because as a kid, when I told my parents what was being said to me, they told me to shake it off because it wasn’t a big deal. No one ever taught me how to deal with those daily tiny jabs. I’d talk to my few black friends and they didn’t know how to define the experience so they continued to hurt, but I just thought that was just part of being black. And truthfully, I wanted to give my friends the benefit of the doubt rather than confront the fact that what they were saying to me was racist. Am I proud of that? Not at all. Is that embarrassing? Completely! I’m really lucky that my now good friend/mentor, Jukebox Jones aka @WeSeeRace reached out to me and offered to school me after getting ripped apart on Tumblr. That first phone call was around 2 hours and was BRUTAL. She told me all about myself and I cried like a baby. I didn’t understand why so much of black Tumblr was attacking me or why people thought my Anderson appearance was so bad. She talked to me like a stern parent and gave me a bunch of reading assignments. She told me she’d be there to talk to me anytime I had questions. At first it sucked, but it was worth it and largely because of her and a few others I’ve grown up and learned A LOT. So thank you Jukebox, g-aesthetic, racismschool and everyone else that has given me a chance to redeem myself following that abysmal appearance. Given that, this is why I’m so passionate about talking about social issues and trying to explain them in a way that’s easy to digest, especially for other black folk who are where I was last year. Sheltered, whitewashed “good black girl” colorblind types that stand up for white people any time racism gets brought up and think that it’s winning them brownie points. Look, they can be tough to deal with, but as someone that used to be that girl, please don’t give up on us. Remember our parents and school systems aren’t teaching us how to be black. They’re telling us to assimilate and conform to whiteness, assuming that’s going to “protect us” and help us get ahead in life, when in reality it holds us back more than we realize.
    High Resolution

    chescaleigh:

    So this has come up a few times on Tumblr, but I guess it’s worth re-posting. Here are my thoughts from earlier this year when I got invited to appear on Dr. Phil (I politely declined) to talk about my Slut Shaming video:

    When I did Anderson Cooper last year, I was COMPLETELY unprepared. This resulted in me flubbing some major questions (“no, these statements aren’t racist!” doh) which then lead to me getting called out BIG TIME by the Tumblr SJ community. Fun times. In the year since, I’ve learned a great deal about racism and privilege (mine included) and would answer many of those questions completely differently. Moreover, I learned my lesson when it comes to preparing for tv interviews. First order of business: be prepared.

    To make matters worse, at times the Anderson editing was rather deceptive. My biggest issue? Shots of me chillin’ between takes were used as reaction shots, which made me appear weak, nervous and unsure during some of the audience questions. Also, many positive comments/questions were left out, making the conversation at times appear one sided. Believe me, I’m not saying this to throw anyone on the show under the bus. The staff was super nice and my appearance opened some great doors for me. I mention this only because sometimes it’s easy to forget that talk shows and reality tv aren’t really all that “real”.

    So here’s where I’m at these days. Looking back, I really didn’t understand the scope of what “Shit White Girl Say…to Black Girls” had done or really meant until I read some of the things written about it. I knew it was honest and funny, but I didn’t think it was ground breaking, it would get me tv jobs and network appearances or that college professors would be asking students to write about it. I’d never heard the term micro-agressions before and had legitimately never considered any of those things to be racist. Why? Well, because as a kid, when I told my parents what was being said to me, they told me to shake it off because it wasn’t a big deal. No one ever taught me how to deal with those daily tiny jabs. I’d talk to my few black friends and they didn’t know how to define the experience so they continued to hurt, but I just thought that was just part of being black. And truthfully, I wanted to give my friends the benefit of the doubt rather than confront the fact that what they were saying to me was racist. Am I proud of that? Not at all. Is that embarrassing? Completely!

    I’m really lucky that my now good friend/mentor, Jukebox Jones aka @WeSeeRace reached out to me and offered to school me after getting ripped apart on Tumblr. That first phone call was around 2 hours and was BRUTAL. She told me all about myself and I cried like a baby. I didn’t understand why so much of black Tumblr was attacking me or why people thought my Anderson appearance was so bad. She talked to me like a stern parent and gave me a bunch of reading assignments. She told me she’d be there to talk to me anytime I had questions. At first it sucked, but it was worth it and largely because of her and a few others I’ve grown up and learned A LOT. So thank you Jukebox, g-aesthetic, racismschool and everyone else that has given me a chance to redeem myself following that abysmal appearance.

    Given that, this is why I’m so passionate about talking about social issues and trying to explain them in a way that’s easy to digest, especially for other black folk who are where I was last year. Sheltered, whitewashed “good black girl” colorblind types that stand up for white people any time racism gets brought up and think that it’s winning them brownie points. Look, they can be tough to deal with, but as someone that used to be that girl, please don’t give up on us. Remember our parents and school systems aren’t teaching us how to be black. They’re telling us to assimilate and conform to whiteness, assuming that’s going to “protect us” and help us get ahead in life, when in reality it holds us back more than we realize.

  11. dynamicafrica:

Martha Chumo, a 19-year-old self-taught programmer, was supposed to be in New York right now, honing her coding skills and mastering cutting-edge technologies in the company of fellow software enthusiasts.
Instead, she’s thousands of miles away, in her hometown of Nairobi, Kenya.
A few months ago, Chumo was accepted into the summer intake of Hacker School, a U.S.-based “retreat for hackers,” where budding programmers come together for three months to write code, learn new languages and share industry insights.
Whereas the programming boot camp was free to attend, Chumo still needed to find a way to cover her trip costs and buy a new laptop. Excited and determined, the young developer turned to online crowdsourcing platform Indiegogo for funds. She set a target of $4,200 and managed to raise nearly $5,800. All she needed then was a visa to travel to the United States.
Alas, this was not to be.  As an unmarried adult who was not enrolled at university, Chumo was not eligible for a U.S. tourist visa because she couldn’t show sufficient “social ties” to Kenya to prove that she was planning to return home after attending Hacker School.*
But the U.S. consulate’s refusal only served to slightly alter the plans of this passionate coder.
"I thought if I can’t go to the hacker school, let me try to bring the school to me," says Chumo. "(Let me see) what can I do to start a school here."
Within minutes of her second visa request denial, on June 4, Chumo was calling her friends to announce that, “I’m starting a hacker school in Kenya!’
A few days later, she launched another Indiegogo campaign asking people to help her set up her own school for developers in Nairobi.
"I was so frustrated because I had applied to go to Hacker School; I got into it, I raised funds to go there, I had all these plans to read and learn for three months and then I’m not allowed to go — that’s how the idea for the school was born."
(cont. reading)
*For those who don’t know how hard the visa struggle for those of us with African passports is, this is just one of the ways that we are systematically denied opportunities. Meanwhile, tourists from many Western nations are free to visit many African countries without a visa and stay for up to 90 consecutive days in some of them.
But MAJOR props to Martha Chumo for taking up the initiative to create her own opportunities.
dynamicafrica:

Martha Chumo, a 19-year-old self-taught programmer, was supposed to be in New York right now, honing her coding skills and mastering cutting-edge technologies in the company of fellow software enthusiasts.
Instead, she’s thousands of miles away, in her hometown of Nairobi, Kenya.
A few months ago, Chumo was accepted into the summer intake of Hacker School, a U.S.-based “retreat for hackers,” where budding programmers come together for three months to write code, learn new languages and share industry insights.
Whereas the programming boot camp was free to attend, Chumo still needed to find a way to cover her trip costs and buy a new laptop. Excited and determined, the young developer turned to online crowdsourcing platform Indiegogo for funds. She set a target of $4,200 and managed to raise nearly $5,800. All she needed then was a visa to travel to the United States.
Alas, this was not to be.  As an unmarried adult who was not enrolled at university, Chumo was not eligible for a U.S. tourist visa because she couldn’t show sufficient “social ties” to Kenya to prove that she was planning to return home after attending Hacker School.*
But the U.S. consulate’s refusal only served to slightly alter the plans of this passionate coder.
"I thought if I can’t go to the hacker school, let me try to bring the school to me," says Chumo. "(Let me see) what can I do to start a school here."
Within minutes of her second visa request denial, on June 4, Chumo was calling her friends to announce that, “I’m starting a hacker school in Kenya!’
A few days later, she launched another Indiegogo campaign asking people to help her set up her own school for developers in Nairobi.
"I was so frustrated because I had applied to go to Hacker School; I got into it, I raised funds to go there, I had all these plans to read and learn for three months and then I’m not allowed to go — that’s how the idea for the school was born."
(cont. reading)
*For those who don’t know how hard the visa struggle for those of us with African passports is, this is just one of the ways that we are systematically denied opportunities. Meanwhile, tourists from many Western nations are free to visit many African countries without a visa and stay for up to 90 consecutive days in some of them.
But MAJOR props to Martha Chumo for taking up the initiative to create her own opportunities.
    High Resolution

    dynamicafrica:

    Martha Chumo, a 19-year-old self-taught programmer, was supposed to be in New York right now, honing her coding skills and mastering cutting-edge technologies in the company of fellow software enthusiasts.

    Instead, she’s thousands of miles away, in her hometown of Nairobi, Kenya.

    A few months ago, Chumo was accepted into the summer intake of Hacker School, a U.S.-based “retreat for hackers,” where budding programmers come together for three months to write code, learn new languages and share industry insights.

    Whereas the programming boot camp was free to attend, Chumo still needed to find a way to cover her trip costs and buy a new laptop. Excited and determined, the young developer turned to online crowdsourcing platform Indiegogo for funds. She set a target of $4,200 and managed to raise nearly $5,800. All she needed then was a visa to travel to the United States.

    Alas, this was not to be. As an unmarried adult who was not enrolled at university, Chumo was not eligible for a U.S. tourist visa because she couldn’t show sufficient “social ties” to Kenya to prove that she was planning to return home after attending Hacker School.*

    But the U.S. consulate’s refusal only served to slightly alter the plans of this passionate coder.

    "I thought if I can’t go to the hacker school, let me try to bring the school to me," says Chumo. "(Let me see) what can I do to start a school here."

    Within minutes of her second visa request denial, on June 4, Chumo was calling her friends to announce that, “I’m starting a hacker school in Kenya!’

    A few days later, she launched another Indiegogo campaign asking people to help her set up her own school for developers in Nairobi.

    "I was so frustrated because I had applied to go to Hacker School; I got into it, I raised funds to go there, I had all these plans to read and learn for three months and then I’m not allowed to go — that’s how the idea for the school was born."

    (cont. reading)

    *For those who don’t know how hard the visa struggle for those of us with African passports is, this is just one of the ways that we are systematically denied opportunities. Meanwhile, tourists from many Western nations are free to visit many African countries without a visa and stay for up to 90 consecutive days in some of them.

    But MAJOR props to Martha Chumo for taking up the initiative to create her own opportunities.

    (via africaisdonesuffering)

  12. Link/ Pacific Islanders: a Misclassified People

    apiasfrepresent:

    Kawika Riley, the CEO and Founder of the Pacific Islander Access project (and a community voice on re/present!), shared this piece regarding access to higher education for Pacific Islanders in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

    Despite the clear data, Pacific Islanders are not eligible for many scholarships and fellowships designated for underrepresented minorities. I learned about this firsthand when I was an undergraduate. A friendly, well-intentioned representative from a scholarly program explained to me that, basically, “Pacific Islanders are Asian Pacific Islanders, and Asians are not underrepresented, so Pacific Islanders are not underrepresented.”

    Full article here.

    (via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

  13. Tumblr, undocumented youth need you!

    third-worlding:

    Janet Napolitano, the current DHS secretary, is on her way to becoming President of the University of California system.

    Napolitano helped design policies that makes President Obama the deporter in chief. Under his administration and her supervision, more than 1.7 million people were deported. No other administration has matched this feat.

    UC undocumented youth are protesting her appointment. Not only does Napolitano have no experience as a professor or educator, she is entering a state and a community that has ardently fought against her immigration policies.

    Support undocumented youth and spread the news about her appointment. A few minutes ago, she was confirmed. But that does not mean she can pull the wool over the eyes of America and California students.

    Specifically, target white feminists allies like Ms. Magazine who are applauding her as the first female UC president. A woman who has hurt thousands of other women is no feminist icon.

    (via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)


  14. High Resolution

    (Source: anotherjc, via jangojips)

  15. malacanan:


"The evil is that the indolence in the Philippines is a magnified indolence, an indolence of the snowball type, if we may be permitted the expression, an evil that increases in direct proportion to the periods of time, and effect of misgovernment and of backwardness, as we have said, and not a cause thereof.” [Read the entire text here]

TODAY IN HISTORY: In 1890, Jose Rizal’s “The Indolence of the Filipinos” was published in the La Solidaridad. It was printed in 5 installments, which ran from July 15, 1890 to September 15, 1890. [img via]
The essay was Rizal’s effort to educate his countrymen by revealing truths about their own faults as well as arousing the Spaniards to the defects in their colonial system.
malacanan:


"The evil is that the indolence in the Philippines is a magnified indolence, an indolence of the snowball type, if we may be permitted the expression, an evil that increases in direct proportion to the periods of time, and effect of misgovernment and of backwardness, as we have said, and not a cause thereof.” [Read the entire text here]

TODAY IN HISTORY: In 1890, Jose Rizal’s “The Indolence of the Filipinos” was published in the La Solidaridad. It was printed in 5 installments, which ran from July 15, 1890 to September 15, 1890. [img via]
The essay was Rizal’s effort to educate his countrymen by revealing truths about their own faults as well as arousing the Spaniards to the defects in their colonial system.
    High Resolution

    malacanan:

    "The evil is that the indolence in the Philippines is a magnified indolence, an indolence of the snowball type, if we may be permitted the expression, an evil that increases in direct proportion to the periods of time, and effect of misgovernment and of backwardness, as we have said, and not a cause thereof.” [Read the entire text here]

    TODAY IN HISTORY: In 1890, Jose Rizal’s “The Indolence of the Filipinos” was published in the La Solidaridad. It was printed in 5 installments, which ran from July 15, 1890 to September 15, 1890. [img via]

    The essay was Rizal’s effort to educate his countrymen by revealing truths about their own faults as well as arousing the Spaniards to the defects in their colonial system.

    (via ellobofilipino)