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  1. Indian College excavation reopens in Harvard Yard

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.- This fall, Harvard archaeologists will continue excavations in Harvard Yard in the area of the 17th-century Indian College sited near Matthews Hall. This is the 4th excavation season in this area of the Yard. (Earlier excavations took place in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011). A foundation trench believed to be part of the old Indian College was found in 2009, and confirmed in 2011. This season, the class will continue to trace the Indian College foundation.

    On Thursday, September 11 at 1:30 pm, The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University Anthropology Department, and Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) invite the public to join the opening ceremony for the fall 2014 archaeological excavation in Harvard Yard. Read more.

  2. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece.
    High Resolution

    erikkwakkel:

    Devouring a book

    As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.

    Pic: image taken from this news piece.

  3. What We Learned About Human Origins in 2013

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    The existence of a mysterious ancient human lineage and the possibility that the earliest humans were actually all one species were among the human-evolution-related discoveries of 2013. Other breakthroughs include the sequencing of the oldest human DNA yet.

    Here’s a look at what scientists learned about humanity and human origins this year:

    Mystery lineage

    Recent analyses of fossil DNA have revealed that modern humans occasionally had sex and produced offspring not only with Neanderthals but also with Denisovans, a relatively newfound lineage whose genetic signature apparently extended from Siberia to the Pacific islands of Oceania. Read more.

  4. ancientart:

    Mesoamerican jaguar sculpture,

    The Jaguar was one of the mythological creations of the cultures of the Gulf Coast, the Olmec were the first to bring the animal to such high levels and was accepted by other cultures like Teotihuacan and the Mexica.

    Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photos taken by Travis S.

    (via plio-cavedeposits)

  5. mertseger:

Silla, 6th centuryFrom the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.

    mertseger:

    Silla, 6th century

    From the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.

    (via non-westernhistoricalfashion)

  6. gwaraldine:

ancientart:

Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.
gwaraldine:

ancientart:

Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.
    High Resolution

    gwaraldine:

    ancientart:

    Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 

    Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

    man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.

    (via kakaimeitahi)

  7. centuriespast:

Double Crocodile Effigy
Gran Coclé
Gold, 500-850 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum
centuriespast:

Double Crocodile Effigy
Gran Coclé
Gold, 500-850 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum
    High Resolution

    centuriespast:

    Double Crocodile Effigy

    Gran Coclé

    Gold, 500-850 CE

    Thomas Gilcrease Museum

  8. tammuz:

Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

    tammuz:

    Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

    Photo by Babylon Chronicle

    (via plio-cavedeposits)

  9. centuriespast:

Monkey Effigy Pendant
Gran Coclé
Gold, 700-1000 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum

    centuriespast:

    Monkey Effigy Pendant

    Gran Coclé

    Gold, 700-1000 CE

    Thomas Gilcrease Museum

  10. theolduvaigorge:

    The Upper Palaeolithic of Manot Cave, Western Galilee, Israel: the 2011–12 excavations

    • by Ofer Marder, Bridget Alex, Avner Ayalon, Miryam Bar-Matthews, Guy Bar-Oz, Daniella Bar-Yosef Mayer, Francesco Berna, Elisabetta Boaretto, Valentina Caracuta, Amos Frumkin, Mae Goder-Goldberger, Israel Hershkovitz, Bruce Latimer, Ron Lavi, Alan Matthews, Stephen Weiner, Udi Weiss, Gal Yas’ur, Reuven Yeshurun & Omry Barzilai

    "The Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant (45,000–22,000 BP) represents the full establishment of modern human behavior in this region following the existence of both modern humans and Neanderthals during the Middle Palaeolithic. The Levantine Upper Palaeolithic shares some similarities to its European counterpart but otherwise is quite different.

    The Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant was initially divided into six chronological phases following European cultural terminology (Neuville 1934; Garrod 1951). This linear division was based on the correlation between diagnostic chipped stone tool types and cave stratigraphy in Mount Carmel and the Judaean Desert. During the 1970–80s, as a result of intensive field work in the arid regions of the southern Levant (e.g. Bar-Yosef and Phillips 1977; Marks 1983), a new chrono-cultural framework was proposed. It was suggested that at least two cultures traditions, the Ahmarian and the Levantine Aurignacian, co-existed contemporarily (Gilead 1981; Marks 1981). The Ahmarian is characterised by blade/bladelet production and typologically by the high frequency of blade tools including el-Wad points. The Levantine Aurignacian is typologically marked by nosed and carinated items, retouched bladelets (‘Dufour’) and a rich bone and antler industry (Belfer-Cohen and Bar-Yosef 1999). In addition, el-Wad points have been found associated with the Levantine Aurignacian. Later, this model was refined and split further into several cultural entities (e.g. Goring-Morris & Belfer-Cohen 2003)” (read more/open access).

    (Open access source: Antiquity 087(337), 2013 via Academia.edu)

    (via zomganthro)

  11. mediumaevum:

During the 15th century, off the Hoi An coast of Vietnam in the South China Sea, a trading vessel filled with porcelain vanished without a trace. 
This is the story of this hoard’s amazing excavation.
mediumaevum:

During the 15th century, off the Hoi An coast of Vietnam in the South China Sea, a trading vessel filled with porcelain vanished without a trace. 
This is the story of this hoard’s amazing excavation.
    High Resolution

    mediumaevum:

    During the 15th century, off the Hoi An coast of Vietnam in the South China Sea, a trading vessel filled with porcelain vanished without a trace. 

    This is the story of this hoard’s amazing excavation.

  12. medievalpoc:

Unknown Hispano-Moresque Ceramicist
Basin with a Horseman Spearing a Serpent
Spain (1390)
Earthenware, tin-glazed (lusterware)
17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm)
The earliest example of medieval lusterware in the Museum’s collection, this basin was probably either used as a serving dish or intended only for display. The brilliant coloring and expert craftsmanship of Spanish lusterware made it renowned throughout Europe.
As early as the tenth century, the Moors in Spain had mastered the technique of lusterware, and by the turn of the fifteenth, when this basin was made, artists were still following those same glazing methods. The choice of decoration was sometimes indebted to Moorish motifs but could also be drawn from Western imagery, as is the case with this representation of a horseman spearing a serpent, perhaps inspired by the legend of Saint George and the dragon.
The coats of arms on the shields that decorate the basin’s rim have not yet been identified. The first step in the technique of Spanish lusterware was to glaze a fired piece of clay with an undercoat of white and then paint the design in deep blue. Details could be obtained by sgraffito-a method of scratching the surface to reveal the white undercoat.
Luster, a mixture of silver and copper oxides to which red ocher, silt, and vinegar were added, was applied only after a second firing. It was this last step, mixing and applying the luster and then firing the lustered object, that distinguishes Hispano-Moresque wares from other contemporary ceramic production.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
medievalpoc:

Unknown Hispano-Moresque Ceramicist
Basin with a Horseman Spearing a Serpent
Spain (1390)
Earthenware, tin-glazed (lusterware)
17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm)
The earliest example of medieval lusterware in the Museum’s collection, this basin was probably either used as a serving dish or intended only for display. The brilliant coloring and expert craftsmanship of Spanish lusterware made it renowned throughout Europe.
As early as the tenth century, the Moors in Spain had mastered the technique of lusterware, and by the turn of the fifteenth, when this basin was made, artists were still following those same glazing methods. The choice of decoration was sometimes indebted to Moorish motifs but could also be drawn from Western imagery, as is the case with this representation of a horseman spearing a serpent, perhaps inspired by the legend of Saint George and the dragon.
The coats of arms on the shields that decorate the basin’s rim have not yet been identified. The first step in the technique of Spanish lusterware was to glaze a fired piece of clay with an undercoat of white and then paint the design in deep blue. Details could be obtained by sgraffito-a method of scratching the surface to reveal the white undercoat.
Luster, a mixture of silver and copper oxides to which red ocher, silt, and vinegar were added, was applied only after a second firing. It was this last step, mixing and applying the luster and then firing the lustered object, that distinguishes Hispano-Moresque wares from other contemporary ceramic production.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    High Resolution

    medievalpoc:

    Unknown Hispano-Moresque Ceramicist

    Basin with a Horseman Spearing a Serpent

    Spain (1390)

    Earthenware, tin-glazed (lusterware)

    17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm)

    The earliest example of medieval lusterware in the Museum’s collection, this basin was probably either used as a serving dish or intended only for display. The brilliant coloring and expert craftsmanship of Spanish lusterware made it renowned throughout Europe.

    As early as the tenth century, the Moors in Spain had mastered the technique of lusterware, and by the turn of the fifteenth, when this basin was made, artists were still following those same glazing methods. The choice of decoration was sometimes indebted to Moorish motifs but could also be drawn from Western imagery, as is the case with this representation of a horseman spearing a serpent, perhaps inspired by the legend of Saint George and the dragon.

    The coats of arms on the shields that decorate the basin’s rim have not yet been identified. The first step in the technique of Spanish lusterware was to glaze a fired piece of clay with an undercoat of white and then paint the design in deep blue. Details could be obtained by sgraffito-a method of scratching the surface to reveal the white undercoat.

    Luster, a mixture of silver and copper oxides to which red ocher, silt, and vinegar were added, was applied only after a second firing. It was this last step, mixing and applying the luster and then firing the lustered object, that distinguishes Hispano-Moresque wares from other contemporary ceramic production.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

  13. anthropologyyy:

Zoomorphic Vessel,1350-1000 B.C., Northern Iran

    anthropologyyy:

    Zoomorphic Vessel,1350-1000 B.C., Northern Iran

    (via plio-cavedeposits)

  14. centuriespast:

Seated Court Musician
Unknown (Gulf Coast Mexico, Unknown)
300—600 C.
Figures of musicians were frequently placed in burial chambers, indicating they were popular in ancient Mexican cultures. This musician sits to play an instrument made of a turtle shell and a deer antler. His ear plugs and the scarification on his shoulders and face are typical adornment. Sculpture from the Nayarit area of western Mexico is characterized by rough, dark red surfaces, geometric designs, and elaborate ornament and body paint.
Columbus Art Museum
centuriespast:

Seated Court Musician
Unknown (Gulf Coast Mexico, Unknown)
300—600 C.
Figures of musicians were frequently placed in burial chambers, indicating they were popular in ancient Mexican cultures. This musician sits to play an instrument made of a turtle shell and a deer antler. His ear plugs and the scarification on his shoulders and face are typical adornment. Sculpture from the Nayarit area of western Mexico is characterized by rough, dark red surfaces, geometric designs, and elaborate ornament and body paint.
Columbus Art Museum
    High Resolution

    centuriespast:

    Seated Court Musician

    Unknown (Gulf Coast Mexico, Unknown)

    300—600 C.

    Figures of musicians were frequently placed in burial chambers, indicating they were popular in ancient Mexican cultures. This musician sits to play an instrument made of a turtle shell and a deer antler. His ear plugs and the scarification on his shoulders and face are typical adornment. Sculpture from the Nayarit area of western Mexico is characterized by rough, dark red surfaces, geometric designs, and elaborate ornament and body paint.


    Columbus Art Museum

  15. asean-community:

    ASEAN Community
    Hagabi, Philippines

    Hagabi is an Igorot lounging bench made of wood that serves as the status symbol of the owner. It shows that the owner, mostly the Kadanagyan who belongs to the upper class of the society, is wealthy and has a power. This bench is made of mahogony from the Philippines (shorea negrosensis) and has a length of 4.04m.

    (via saintshiva)