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  1. medievalpoc:

    Agostino Brunias

    The West India Washerwomen

    England (1779)

    Stipple engraving and etching on moderately thick, moderately textured, beige wove paper.(sheet) 50.4 x 33.3 cm.

    This print is interesting for three reasons. Firstly, because it was both designed and made into a print by Agostino Brunias, the Italian Painter working for/in England and commissioned to paint and document the people of the West Indies.

    Secondly, it uses stippling instead of crosshatching to create the printed image, which is considerably more detailed and challenging than the usual crosshatch method used for mass-produced woodblock or copper engravings and prints. The effect is notably superior in detail and shade to other prints, and faithfully shows skin tone, if not color. The three women and the baby in this print are very skillfully rendered, and it goes to show that this critic who urged the museum to sell their Agostino Brunias collection due to the “poor quality” of the work was entirely wrongsauce.

    Thirdly, they haven’t sold this one yet, so there’s that.

    [x]

  2. The pseudo-theory on origins of the ‘Malay race’ -€“ Lilianne Fan

    southeastasianists:

    These reactions, largely expressed through social media, have yet, however, to lead to a critical scholarly and public debate. Such a debate should interrogate not just the content of the theory itself, but also the very persistence of the concept of ‘race’ in Malaysian public life. Why does ‘race’, an outdated category in so many parts of the world, still matter so much in Malaysia? And what does the rise in research on racial origins and authenticity actually reveal?

  3. theolduvaigorge:

    Unconstrained 3D-kinematics of prehension in five primates: Lemur, capuchin, gorilla, chimpanzee, human

    • by Elodie Reghem, Laurence Chèze, Yves Coppens and Emmanuelle Pouydebat

    Primates are known for their use of the hand in many activities including food grasping. Yet, most studies concentrate on the type of grip used. Moreover, kinematic studies remain limited to a few investigations of the distal elements in constrained conditions in humans and macaques. In order to improve our understanding of the prehension movement in primates, we analyse here the behavioural strategies (e.g., types of grip, body postures) as well as the 3D kinematics of the whole forelimb and the trunk during the prehension of small static food items in five primate species in unconstrained conditions. All species preferred the quadrupedal posture except lemurs, which used a typical crouched posture. Grasp type differed among species, with smaller animals (capuchins and lemurs) using a whole-hand grip and larger animals (humans, gorillas, chimpanzees) using predominantly a precision grip. Larger animals had lower relative wrist velocities and spent a larger proportion of the movement decelerating. Humans grasped food items with planar motions involving small joint rotations, more similar to the smaller animals than to gorillas and chimpanzees, which used greater rotations of both the shoulder and fore- arm. In conclusion, the features characterising human food prehension are present in other primates, yet differences exist in joint motions. These results provide a good basis to suggest hypotheses concerning the factors involved in driving the evolution of grasping abilities in primates” (read more/not open access).

    (Source: Journal of Human Evolution 65:303-312, 2013)

    (via alphacaeli)

  4. What We Learned About Human Origins in 2013

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    The existence of a mysterious ancient human lineage and the possibility that the earliest humans were actually all one species were among the human-evolution-related discoveries of 2013. Other breakthroughs include the sequencing of the oldest human DNA yet.

    Here’s a look at what scientists learned about humanity and human origins this year:

    Mystery lineage

    Recent analyses of fossil DNA have revealed that modern humans occasionally had sex and produced offspring not only with Neanderthals but also with Denisovans, a relatively newfound lineage whose genetic signature apparently extended from Siberia to the Pacific islands of Oceania. Read more.

  5. ancientart:

    Mesoamerican jaguar sculpture,

    The Jaguar was one of the mythological creations of the cultures of the Gulf Coast, the Olmec were the first to bring the animal to such high levels and was accepted by other cultures like Teotihuacan and the Mexica.

    Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photos taken by Travis S.

    (via plio-cavedeposits)

  6. mertseger:

Silla, 6th centuryFrom the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.

    mertseger:

    Silla, 6th century

    From the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.

    (via non-westernhistoricalfashion)

  7. gwaraldine:

ancientart:

Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.
gwaraldine:

ancientart:

Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.
    High Resolution

    gwaraldine:

    ancientart:

    Ancient remains of a Polynesian religious monument underwater, Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, Oceania. 

    Photo courtesy & taken by Johanna Loock.

    man i hope the underwater arch. field school runs in yap next summer.

    (via kakaimeitahi)

  8. theolduvaigorge:

    Dental Topography of Platyrrhines and Prosimians: Convergence and Contrasts

    • by Julia M. Winchester, Doug M. Boyer, Elizabeth M. St. Clair, Ashley D. Gosselin-Ildari, Siobhán B. Cooke and Justin A. Ledogar

    Dental topographic analysis is the quantitative assessment of shape of three-dimensional models of tooth crowns and component features. Molar topographic curvature, relief, and complexity correlate with aspects of feeding behavior in certain living primates, and have been employed to investigate dietary ecology in extant and extinct primate species. This study investigates whether dental topography correlates with diet among a diverse sample of living platyrrhines, and compares platyrrhine topography with that of prosimians. We sampled 111 lower second molars of 11 platyrrhine genera and 121 of 20 prosimian genera. For each tooth we calculated Dirichlet normal energy (DNE), relief index (RFI), and orientation patch count (OPCR), quantifying surface curvature, relief, and complexity respectively. Shearing ratios and quotients were also measured. Statistical analyses partitioned effects of diet and taxon on topography in platyrrhines alone and relative to prosimians. Discriminant function analyses assessed predictive diet models. Results indicate that platyrrhine dental topography correlates to dietary preference, and platyrrhine-only predictive models yield high rates of accuracy. The same is true for prosimians. Topographic variance is broadly similar among platyrrhines and prosimians. One exception is that platyrrhines display higher average relief and lower relief variance, possibly related to lower relative molar size and functional links between relief and tooth longevity distinct from curvature or complexity. Explicitly incorporating phylogenetic distance matrices into statistical analyses of the combined platyrrhine-prosimian sample results in loss of significance of dietary effects for OPCR and SQ, while greatly increasing dietary significance of RFI” (read more/not open access).

    (Source: American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153:29-44, 2014)

    (via alphacaeli)

  9. alivesoul:

Born on this day…
Zora Neale Hurston, Writer
“Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to ‘jump at the sun.’ We might not land on the sun, but at least we would get off the ground.” - Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston
Bio
Photo
alivesoul:

Born on this day…
Zora Neale Hurston, Writer
“Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to ‘jump at the sun.’ We might not land on the sun, but at least we would get off the ground.” - Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston
Bio
Photo
    High Resolution

    alivesoul:

    Born on this day…

    Zora Neale Hurston, Writer

    “Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to ‘jump at the sun.’ We might not land on the sun, but at least we would get off the ground.” - Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston

    Bio

    Photo

    (via aphotic-eniola)

  10. archival video of Bontoc life (1913)

  11. centuriespast:

Double Crocodile Effigy
Gran Coclé
Gold, 500-850 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum
centuriespast:

Double Crocodile Effigy
Gran Coclé
Gold, 500-850 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum
    High Resolution

    centuriespast:

    Double Crocodile Effigy

    Gran Coclé

    Gold, 500-850 CE

    Thomas Gilcrease Museum

  12. tammuz:

Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

    tammuz:

    Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

    Photo by Babylon Chronicle

    (via plio-cavedeposits)

  13. centuriespast:

Monkey Effigy Pendant
Gran Coclé
Gold, 700-1000 CE
Thomas Gilcrease Museum

    centuriespast:

    Monkey Effigy Pendant

    Gran Coclé

    Gold, 700-1000 CE

    Thomas Gilcrease Museum

  14. Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state. Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state.
    High Resolution

    Native photographer Matika Wilbur is on a journey across the country to photograph all the Native people of the US. Her work, Project 562, is named for the 562+ Federally recognized Tribal Nations and can be viewed on her blog as she makes her progress through each state.

  15. theolduvaigorge:

    The Upper Palaeolithic of Manot Cave, Western Galilee, Israel: the 2011–12 excavations

    • by Ofer Marder, Bridget Alex, Avner Ayalon, Miryam Bar-Matthews, Guy Bar-Oz, Daniella Bar-Yosef Mayer, Francesco Berna, Elisabetta Boaretto, Valentina Caracuta, Amos Frumkin, Mae Goder-Goldberger, Israel Hershkovitz, Bruce Latimer, Ron Lavi, Alan Matthews, Stephen Weiner, Udi Weiss, Gal Yas’ur, Reuven Yeshurun & Omry Barzilai

    "The Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant (45,000–22,000 BP) represents the full establishment of modern human behavior in this region following the existence of both modern humans and Neanderthals during the Middle Palaeolithic. The Levantine Upper Palaeolithic shares some similarities to its European counterpart but otherwise is quite different.

    The Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant was initially divided into six chronological phases following European cultural terminology (Neuville 1934; Garrod 1951). This linear division was based on the correlation between diagnostic chipped stone tool types and cave stratigraphy in Mount Carmel and the Judaean Desert. During the 1970–80s, as a result of intensive field work in the arid regions of the southern Levant (e.g. Bar-Yosef and Phillips 1977; Marks 1983), a new chrono-cultural framework was proposed. It was suggested that at least two cultures traditions, the Ahmarian and the Levantine Aurignacian, co-existed contemporarily (Gilead 1981; Marks 1981). The Ahmarian is characterised by blade/bladelet production and typologically by the high frequency of blade tools including el-Wad points. The Levantine Aurignacian is typologically marked by nosed and carinated items, retouched bladelets (‘Dufour’) and a rich bone and antler industry (Belfer-Cohen and Bar-Yosef 1999). In addition, el-Wad points have been found associated with the Levantine Aurignacian. Later, this model was refined and split further into several cultural entities (e.g. Goring-Morris & Belfer-Cohen 2003)” (read more/open access).

    (Open access source: Antiquity 087(337), 2013 via Academia.edu)

    (via zomganthro)