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  1. The British Library digitized the Boke of Margery Kempe and made it freely available to view!!

  2. vmagazine:

    Mario Testino “Alta Moda”
    Queen Sofia Spanish Institute 684 Park Avenue (between 68th & 69th St) Upper East Side (UES)

    Alta Moda is quite different from the portraits I am perhaps best known for,” famed fashion photographer Mario Testino said of his latest exhibit.

    Testino has strayed away from his typical subjects—celebrities and fashion models—and traded them in for natives of his home country, Peru. Alta Moda—which translates from Spanish as “high fashion” -  refers to the vibrant and ornate traditional and festive dress of Peruvians in Cusco, the historic capital of the ancient Inca Empire. 

    “I usually try to capture the moment,” Testino said. “But with this series, I wanted to do something very different—not just with my own work, but also with the practice of photography. I tried to fit as much time and history into each frame as possible—from the traditional and festive clothing to the Chambi backdrops to the Peruvian people in them.”

    The exhibition is curated by Queen Sofia Spanish Institute chairman fashion icon Oscar de la Renta.  source

    Final day of the exhibition: March 29, 2014

    (via sinidentidades)

  3. "

    In 2008, BBC One Television debuted a fantasy TV series about Camelot called Merlin (also called The Adventures of Merlin ), set at the time when Merlin, Arthur and Guinevere were teenagers, before they became legends.

    When the series debuted, viewers quickly noted the racially-diverse cast. Some criticized this multi-racial vision of British legend as “historically inaccurate” and “political correctness,” while others applauded it as a welcome twist which was more reflective of modern British society than the all-white Britain of ancient history.

    But was historical Britain all-white? Were there any people of color in Britain during “Arthurian” times? (And what do we mean by “Arthurian” times anyway?)

    In this lesson, we will investigate the racial composition of Roman & Medieval Britain, and how racial diversity was portrayed in medieval Arthurian legends.

    "

     -

    Black in Camelot: Racial Diversity in Historical England and Arthurian Legend (Fantasy and Sci-Fi in the Classroom)

    VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the Lesson Plan Here!

    Relevant Courses:

    • Writing/Literature
    • History, Classical/Medieval
    • Humanities, Western Civilization
    • Sociology
    • Anthropology/Archaeology

    Student Learning Outcomes

    • Locate and Discuss historical and/or archeological evidence suggesting or disproving the presence of Africans in Roman and medieval Britain (and Europe)
    • Demonstrate awareness of the portrayal of people of color in medieval Arthurian literature
    • Discuss the portrayal of ethnic diversity in current Arthurian-themed television shows and films

    (Source: medievalpoc)

  4. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece.
    High Resolution

    erikkwakkel:

    Devouring a book

    As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.

    Pic: image taken from this news piece.

  5. It’s comparative anatomy time!

    jangojips:

    Yey comparative anatomy!
    These are both from bobcats. The cranium on the right is pretty normative. The cranium on the left is from the ULTIMATE bobcat. Notice how robust the left cranium is in comparison to the right! Notice the size difference! So cool!

    image

    Cat (felidae) skulls are distinct due to large, round eye orbits and flat faces. The snouts don’t stick out like a dog (canidae). The cranium on the left is sporting a bit of a sagital crest. The jaws were exceptionally powerful! To the untrained eye, it might not be obvious that these two skulls are from the same species. Individual differences/morphological variants, I tell ya….


  6. medievalpoc:

    Agostino Brunias

    The West India Washerwomen

    England (1779)

    Stipple engraving and etching on moderately thick, moderately textured, beige wove paper.(sheet) 50.4 x 33.3 cm.

    This print is interesting for three reasons. Firstly, because it was both designed and made into a print by Agostino Brunias, the Italian Painter working for/in England and commissioned to paint and document the people of the West Indies.

    Secondly, it uses stippling instead of crosshatching to create the printed image, which is considerably more detailed and challenging than the usual crosshatch method used for mass-produced woodblock or copper engravings and prints. The effect is notably superior in detail and shade to other prints, and faithfully shows skin tone, if not color. The three women and the baby in this print are very skillfully rendered, and it goes to show that this critic who urged the museum to sell their Agostino Brunias collection due to the “poor quality” of the work was entirely wrongsauce.

    Thirdly, they haven’t sold this one yet, so there’s that.

    [x]

  7. The pseudo-theory on origins of the ‘Malay race’ -€“ Lilianne Fan

    southeastasianists:

    These reactions, largely expressed through social media, have yet, however, to lead to a critical scholarly and public debate. Such a debate should interrogate not just the content of the theory itself, but also the very persistence of the concept of ‘race’ in Malaysian public life. Why does ‘race’, an outdated category in so many parts of the world, still matter so much in Malaysia? And what does the rise in research on racial origins and authenticity actually reveal?

  8. centuriespast:

unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood
The Portland Art Museum centuriespast:

unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood
The Portland Art Museum
    High Resolution

    centuriespast:

    unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood

    The Portland Art Museum


  9. High Resolution

    (Source: firsttimeuser, via saintshiva)

  10. flomation:

    PLEASE READ THIS POST

    See this statue? It’s located at the Glendale Central Library. 
    Big deal right? Yes. Yes it is. 

    She sits here today as a memorial for the victims of the sexual slavery and abuse committed by the Japanese imperial military during WWII. Right now, Japan is running a petition to take her down.

    We cannot let this happen.

    Every Wednesday, the woman of Korea that were used as sexual slaves protest and cry out. However, Japan refuses to acknowledge their suffering. There have been no apologies and no recognition.

    Please, please don’t let them get rid of her. Their pain deserves to be recognized and sympathized.

    Luckily, There is a petition going on to save the girl and allow her to continue sitting in Glendale CL. The link can be found here and you can read more about everything that she stands for here.  

    Thank you so much for reading this. Even if you can’t sign this, please signal boost so other people will. 

    [[A big thank you to tumblr user did-we-just-marry-thedevil for bringing this to my attention]]

  11. davidjleonard:

    Israel’s New Racism: The Persecution of African Migrants in the Holy Land

    (via palumboliu)

  12. larockphotography said: My brother is a middle school teacher and I put him on to your blog. He smiled and said he's seen a ghost. Said in education, thinkers like you are almost extinct

    medievalpoc:

    archipluvian:

    medievalpoc:

    This is probably one of the most strangely flattering messages I’ve gotten.

    Because that’s probably exactly how I would feel if I came across this blog rather than running it.

    In the last 15 years or so, American culture has seen a massive shift toward the conservative that i think shocks a lot of people from my generation. Thinkers like me in education are almost extinct, because we have been driven out by financial, social, and political pressures trickling down from the top of the food chain, so to speak.

    It’s no secret that the quality of American education has, in general, been plummeting, along with drastic increases in censorship, pearl-clutching, and the tendency to reframe resistance movements as persecution of the people in power by those who have none.

    In response to this, you’re seeing more and more marginalized people taking advantage of social media to critique, educate, and converse with these shifts in culture….and ushering in a new age of actual accountability that hasn’t really been seen before; at least, not in my lifetime.

    My tone and methods are actually very similar to those of my own high school teachers. Books that I remember doing entire-class projects on, I find out have since been banned. There are many who find me aggressive, unprofessional, and a lot of other adjectives that invoke a sense of “respectability” versus “unprofessionalism” that makes me feel pretty shaken by the insight to the state of what’s going on in many classrooms across America.

    My hope is that with the next ten years or so, we can try and swing the pendulum back towards an ACTUAL center, instead of this false center that’s been artificially created in favor of conservatism, censorship, and erasure.

    Give your brother a hug for me, he’s doing one of the most important and most difficult jobs I can think of.

    Bear in mind that medievalpoc writes about /medieval European/ history from a completely /modern american/ standpoint using modern american definitions of who poc are … she ends up erasing a lot of ppl … like entire races and stuff …. from her accounts like basically only showing ppl she considers poc from her modern american perspective rather than taking into account historical and geographical context and showing all the people who were in that kinda category at the time . Thats her angle

    Which, you know. Would be a lot more of a thing if it was my fault that American education teaches European history at all, much less the WAY it does. But, you don’t care about that. you care about me, and my reaction to the situation, which you apparently feel needs a “warning”. About my “angle”.

    Because the literal exact point of this blog is that Europeans who are VISUALLY considered people of color

    by modern educators

    according to modern definitions of race

    are excluded from European history by modern educators

    because they look like people of color according TO and BECAUSE OF “modern American perspective”.

    The bottom line is, you think I’m DOING the thing I’m actually fighting against.

    I’m fighting the erasure of the people who are BEING erased from history. I’m responding to a situation that is already happening, I’m not creating that situation by talking about it.

    I’ve said a million times, this isn’t history in its OWN context, this is history as WE experience it in OUR context.

    This is about history BECOMES history, and WHY.

    Like, absolutely if you want like literally everything about various European racial and ethnic groups and how they were constructed in their historical geographic area, that’s NOT what you’re getting here. Like, we might touch on it, but it’s not the purpose.

    I didn’t invent the erasure of people who are being EXCLUDED right now in classrooms because of HOW THEY LOOK TO AMERICANS.

    THAT is the situation that I am addressing.

    By all means, feel free to do other things elsewhere.

    I just don’t see why you’re so interested in warning people about what I’m doing here, or seem to think there’s something wrong with that.

  13. yagazieemezi:

    LOVE THIS!!

    When asked what they would make a film about, the women of the Nyamonge neighborhood of Chiga village in Kisumu, Kenya said, "Netball. We always see African women as sad and poor. We want to make a video about something we love." 

    These women are multidimensional. Some own small businesses. Some farm, sell dried fish, make breakfast breads, sell fabric and scarves, or sing for a living. All of them are mothers and most are caregivers for orphans in their own home. They are leaders of water committees and microfinance groups. Their ability is infinite and inspiring. These ladies don’t mess around. 

    Stop the Pity. Unlock the Potential
    Learn more at: http://www.mamahope.org

    (via africaisdonesuffering)

  14. Filipino Mythology, Ghost Stories, Folktales and Superstitions

    shackleboltrps:

    Because Filipino stories are scary and just yes.

    Filipino Mythological Creatures

    Filipino Ghost Stories

    (via southeastasianists)