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  1. Indian College excavation reopens in Harvard Yard

    archaeologicalnews:

    image

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.- This fall, Harvard archaeologists will continue excavations in Harvard Yard in the area of the 17th-century Indian College sited near Matthews Hall. This is the 4th excavation season in this area of the Yard. (Earlier excavations took place in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011). A foundation trench believed to be part of the old Indian College was found in 2009, and confirmed in 2011. This season, the class will continue to trace the Indian College foundation.

    On Thursday, September 11 at 1:30 pm, The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University Anthropology Department, and Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) invite the public to join the opening ceremony for the fall 2014 archaeological excavation in Harvard Yard. Read more.

  2. ellobofilipino:

A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.
Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years. ellobofilipino:

A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.
Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years.
    High Resolution

    ellobofilipino:

    A group of Ifugao men discuss their performance at the public gym, Banaue, Ifugao province, Philippines, after joining the groups participating in the 2014 Imbayah Festival cultural parade on April 27, 2014.

    Imbayah Festival is an event held in Banaue, Ifugao in celebration of the start of the rice-planting season. It is held only once every three years.

  3. amoosebouche:

    I’ve been itching to share this for a while now. My last project was Cinderella, and since there’s already one version of Cinderella for Far Faria, I decided to do a Filipino version version just to mix it up. 

    You can download the app to read it here! 

  4. The British Library digitized the Boke of Margery Kempe and made it freely available to view!!

  5. vmagazine:

    Mario Testino “Alta Moda”
    Queen Sofia Spanish Institute 684 Park Avenue (between 68th & 69th St) Upper East Side (UES)

    Alta Moda is quite different from the portraits I am perhaps best known for,” famed fashion photographer Mario Testino said of his latest exhibit.

    Testino has strayed away from his typical subjects—celebrities and fashion models—and traded them in for natives of his home country, Peru. Alta Moda—which translates from Spanish as “high fashion” -  refers to the vibrant and ornate traditional and festive dress of Peruvians in Cusco, the historic capital of the ancient Inca Empire. 

    “I usually try to capture the moment,” Testino said. “But with this series, I wanted to do something very different—not just with my own work, but also with the practice of photography. I tried to fit as much time and history into each frame as possible—from the traditional and festive clothing to the Chambi backdrops to the Peruvian people in them.”

    The exhibition is curated by Queen Sofia Spanish Institute chairman fashion icon Oscar de la Renta.  source

    Final day of the exhibition: March 29, 2014

    (Source: vmagazine, via sinidentidades)

  6. "

    In 2008, BBC One Television debuted a fantasy TV series about Camelot called Merlin (also called The Adventures of Merlin ), set at the time when Merlin, Arthur and Guinevere were teenagers, before they became legends.

    When the series debuted, viewers quickly noted the racially-diverse cast. Some criticized this multi-racial vision of British legend as “historically inaccurate” and “political correctness,” while others applauded it as a welcome twist which was more reflective of modern British society than the all-white Britain of ancient history.

    But was historical Britain all-white? Were there any people of color in Britain during “Arthurian” times? (And what do we mean by “Arthurian” times anyway?)

    In this lesson, we will investigate the racial composition of Roman & Medieval Britain, and how racial diversity was portrayed in medieval Arthurian legends.

    "

     -

    Black in Camelot: Racial Diversity in Historical England and Arthurian Legend (Fantasy and Sci-Fi in the Classroom)

    VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the Lesson Plan Here!

    Relevant Courses:

    • Writing/Literature
    • History, Classical/Medieval
    • Humanities, Western Civilization
    • Sociology
    • Anthropology/Archaeology

    Student Learning Outcomes

    • Locate and Discuss historical and/or archeological evidence suggesting or disproving the presence of Africans in Roman and medieval Britain (and Europe)
    • Demonstrate awareness of the portrayal of people of color in medieval Arthurian literature
    • Discuss the portrayal of ethnic diversity in current Arthurian-themed television shows and films

    (Source: medievalpoc)

  7. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece. erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece.
    High Resolution

    erikkwakkel:

    Devouring a book

    As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.

    Pic: image taken from this news piece.

  8. It’s comparative anatomy time!

    jangojips:

    Yey comparative anatomy!
    These are both from bobcats. The cranium on the right is pretty normative. The cranium on the left is from the ULTIMATE bobcat. Notice how robust the left cranium is in comparison to the right! Notice the size difference! So cool!

    image

    Cat (felidae) skulls are distinct due to large, round eye orbits and flat faces. The snouts don’t stick out like a dog (canidae). The cranium on the left is sporting a bit of a sagital crest. The jaws were exceptionally powerful! To the untrained eye, it might not be obvious that these two skulls are from the same species. Individual differences/morphological variants, I tell ya….


  9. medievalpoc:

    Agostino Brunias

    The West India Washerwomen

    England (1779)

    Stipple engraving and etching on moderately thick, moderately textured, beige wove paper.(sheet) 50.4 x 33.3 cm.

    This print is interesting for three reasons. Firstly, because it was both designed and made into a print by Agostino Brunias, the Italian Painter working for/in England and commissioned to paint and document the people of the West Indies.

    Secondly, it uses stippling instead of crosshatching to create the printed image, which is considerably more detailed and challenging than the usual crosshatch method used for mass-produced woodblock or copper engravings and prints. The effect is notably superior in detail and shade to other prints, and faithfully shows skin tone, if not color. The three women and the baby in this print are very skillfully rendered, and it goes to show that this critic who urged the museum to sell their Agostino Brunias collection due to the “poor quality” of the work was entirely wrongsauce.

    Thirdly, they haven’t sold this one yet, so there’s that.

    [x]

  10. The pseudo-theory on origins of the ‘Malay race’ -€“ Lilianne Fan

    southeastasianists:

    These reactions, largely expressed through social media, have yet, however, to lead to a critical scholarly and public debate. Such a debate should interrogate not just the content of the theory itself, but also the very persistence of the concept of ‘race’ in Malaysian public life. Why does ‘race’, an outdated category in so many parts of the world, still matter so much in Malaysia? And what does the rise in research on racial origins and authenticity actually reveal?

  11. centuriespast:

unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood
The Portland Art Museum centuriespast:

unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood
The Portland Art Museum
    High Resolution

    centuriespast:

    unknown Bamum Kingdom artist (Bamum Kingdom), Helmet Mask , ca. 1900, wood

    The Portland Art Museum


  12. High Resolution

    (Source: firsttimeuser, via saintshiva)

  13. flomation:

    PLEASE READ THIS POST

    See this statue? It’s located at the Glendale Central Library. 
    Big deal right? Yes. Yes it is. 

    She sits here today as a memorial for the victims of the sexual slavery and abuse committed by the Japanese imperial military during WWII. Right now, Japan is running a petition to take her down.

    We cannot let this happen.

    Every Wednesday, the woman of Korea that were used as sexual slaves protest and cry out. However, Japan refuses to acknowledge their suffering. There have been no apologies and no recognition.

    Please, please don’t let them get rid of her. Their pain deserves to be recognized and sympathized.

    Luckily, There is a petition going on to save the girl and allow her to continue sitting in Glendale CL. The link can be found here and you can read more about everything that she stands for here.  

    Thank you so much for reading this. Even if you can’t sign this, please signal boost so other people will. 

    [[A big thank you to tumblr user did-we-just-marry-thedevil for bringing this to my attention]]